March, 2-5, 1966

Mobridge Weather Conditions For The Four Day Period

  • Maximum Temperature: 30
  • Minimum Temperature: 5
  • Strongest Sustained Winds: 40 mph
  • Strongest Wind Gust: 69 mph
  • Snowfall: 32.2 inches
  • Freezing Rain: 0 inches
  • Lowest Visibility: 0 miles
  • LWSS Score: 7.01
  • LWSS Category: Catastrophic

A large winter storm system slowly tracked across South Dakota, starting the 2nd and ending on the 5th, leaving many areas in utter disarray. The largest snow depth measured was 35 inches at Mobridge. Strong winds of 40-55mph, with gusts to near 100mph, caused blowing snow, which reduced visibility to near-zero in some areas. Snow drifts of 30 ft were reported in sheltered areas, while open fields lay nearly bare. Livestock losses were heavy, including 50,000 cattle, 46,000 sheep, and 1,800 hogs. The largest livestock losses took place in the central and north-central part of the state. Heavy snow collapsed some structures and blocked many roads. The blizzard was rated as one of the most severe the state of South Dakota had ever seen.

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March 11-12, 1977

Mobridge Weekly Tribune March 17, 1977 Headline

 

Mobridge Weather Conditions For The Two Day Period

  • Maximum Temperature: 40
  • Minimum Temperature: 30
  • Strongest Sustained Winds: 29 mph
  • Strongest Wind Gust: 44 mph
  • Snowfall: 13.3 inches
  • Freezing Rain: 0 inches
  • Lowest Visibility: 0 miles
  • LWSS Score: 4.36
  • LWSS Category: Crippling

The second heavy snow of this month occurred when a storm moved eastward across Kansas. Precipitation as moderate rains fell in the eastern sections and as heavy snow in the central sections, where most this area received amounts exceeding four inches. A number of counties reported snow depths of twelve inches or more. Several observers in Todd and Bennett counties reported snow depths of more than 24 inches. Interstate 90 was blocked in the central portion of the state. Many travelers were stranded several days in small towns in that area. Four persons last their lives because of exposure when they became lost in the storm. While the winds caused blizzard conditions, the temperatures were not excessively cold.

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March 17, 1977 Page 3 March 17, 1977 Page 5

March 17, 1977 Page 3

March 17, 1977 Page 5

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March 26-28, 1975

Mobridge Weekly Tribune April 3, 1975 Headline

Mobridge Weather Conditions For The Three Day Period

  • Maximum Temperature: 26
  • Minimum Temperature: 10
  • Strongest Sustained Winds: 28 mph
  • Strongest Wind Gust: 39 mph
  • Snowfall: 14 inches
  • Freezing Rain: 0 inches
  • Lowest Visibility: 0 miles
  • LWSS Score: 4.33
  • LWSS Category: Crippling

On Tuesday, March 25th, the sun shown brilliantly on a snow covered state. However, another storm was developing in the Rockies. Snow began to fall over most of the state early Wednesday morning and by noon the winds had increased to blizzard conditions. By evening, the storm turned northward and crossed into the central portion of the state. Blizzard conditions reduced visibility to near zero and continued into Wednesday night. In the eastern portion, snow changed to rain and freezing rain, forming a layer of glaze ice. Storm conditions continued into Thursday diminishing on Friday. Again, travel was almost halted. Some schools and businesses failed to open. Calving and lambing were occurring during this storm and the previous storm on March 23-24. During these storms losses were estimated at twelve to fifteen thousand calves and cows, five to seven thousand sheep and fifteen hundred to two thousand hogs. On Thursday, a fifteen hundred foot TV transmitting tower at Salem, belonging to KXON-TV was blown over. Two supporting guy wires for the transmitting tower of KJAM radio at Madison were broken. Three of the four fatalities associated with this storm were heart attacks resulting from exertion. The fourth was due to asphyxiation as result of being stranded in a car whose motor was kept running. The snow depth of the two storms ranged from less than one inch in the extreme southeast to slightly more than thirty inches in the central area.

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April 3, 1975 Front Page April 3, 1975 Page 5 April 10, 1975 Front Page April 10, 1975 Page 15

April 3, 1975 Front Page

April 3, 1975 Page 5 April 10, 1975 Front Page April 10, 1975 Page 15

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March 22-24, 1975

Mobridge Weekly Tribune March 27, 1975 Headline

Mobridge Weather Conditions For The Three Day Period

  • Maximum Temperature: 37
  • Minimum Temperature: 10
  • Strongest Sustained Winds: 29 mph
  • Strongest Wind Gust: 45 mph
  • Snowfall: 12.9 inches
  • Freezing Rain: 0 inches
  • Lowest Visibility: 0 miles
  • LWSS Score: 4.33
  • LWSS Category: Crippling

The first of two early spring storms began as light rain in some sections in the north on Saturday evening. Thunderstorms, with some rain which quickly changed to snow, were accompanied by strong winds and created blizzard conditions in the west early Sunday. This early spring storm spread rapidly across the state reaching the eastern sections by evening. Blizzard conditions continued over all the state during Sunday night and most of Monday. In many areas, wind speeds gusted to greater than 60 mph and visibility was often reduced to near zero. Because of poor visibility and drifting snow, all travel became hazardous. Many schools and businesses were closed on Monday. During this storm, the temperatures were generally in the twenties. Snow amounts were quite varied ranging from 4 to 5 inches in the southwest to 12 to 18 inches in the central portion. Some locations in the Black Hills received an addition 2 to 3 feet of snow. Calving and lambing were occurring during this storm. Losses between this storm and the later storm of March 26-28 were estimated at twelve to fifteen thousand calves and cows, five to seven thousand sheep and fifteen hundred to two thousand hogs.

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March 27, 1975 Front Page March 27, 1975 Page 3

March 27, 1975 Front Page

March 27, 1975 Page 3

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March 19-20, 1982

Mobridge Weekly Tribune March 25, 1982 Headline

Mobridge Weather Conditions For The Two Day Period

  • Maximum Temperature: 30
  • Minimum Temperature: 20
  • Strongest Sustained Winds: 26 mph
  • Strongest Wind Gust: 40 mph
  • Snowfall: 14 inches
  • Freezing Rain: 0 inches
  • Lowest Visibility: 0 miles
  • LWSS Score: 4.31
  • LWSS Category: Crippling

A winter storm dropped 10-20 inches of heavy wet snow across the northern two-thirds of South Dakota. Five persons were killed and eight others injured in indirect accidents. Downed power lines caused isolated power outages. A half dozen newborn calves died of exposure near Lemmon in Perkins County. In addition, 5% of the pheasant population in Brown, Edmunds and Faulk Counties were killed. The weight of the snow collapsed a canopy of a grocery store in McLaughlin, Corson County, tearing out part of the brick front and breaking windows in the store.

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March 25, 1982 Front Page March 25, 1982 Page 5 March 25, 1982 Page 8 March 25, 1982 Page 10 March 25, 1982 Page 11

March 25, 1982 Front Page

March 25, 1982 Page 5 March 25, 1982 Page 8 March 25, 1982 Page 10 March 25, 1982 Page 11

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