This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 19 September 1559 → The first hurricane in recorded U.S. history hit Pensacola, FL. As many as seven Spanish expedition ships may have been destroyed.
 19 September 1955Hurricane Ione made landfall near Morehead City, NC with winds over 100 mph. 16.63 inches of rain fell near Maysville, NC. 40 blocks of New Bern, NC were underwater at one point. Seven people lost their lives and total damage was $88 million. This was the third hurricane to cross eastern North Carolina in 5 weeks.
 19 September 2003 → Frog eggs rained on Berlin, CT, during a rain shower from Hurricane Isabel. Since frogs in Connecticut do not lay eggs so late in the year, scientists believed that the storm had carried the eggs from its landfall point in North Carolina, more than 500 miles away.

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April 7, 2001:

Heavy rain of 1 to 3 inches, combined with snowmelt runoff, brought flooding to parts of northeast South Dakota. Many roads across Clark, Grant, Hamlin, Deuel, and Roberts counties were flooded and damaged. Floodwater moving towards the town of Willow Lake overpowered culverts and flooded several homes and several streets. Highway 28 had to be cut through to allow the water to flow away from the town, averting a disaster. Highwater from the creek west of Corona in far Southern Roberts county flowed towards Corona. As a result, 3 1/2 feet of water coursed through town flooding several homes and streets and knocking out the sewer system. Also, 1000 feet of railroad track was damaged by the floodwaters. The Big Sioux River and Lake Poinsett in Hamlin county also rose and resulted in some agricultural land and road flooding. The heavy rain and snowmelt also brought flooding throughout Codington county, especially in the Watertown area along the Big Sioux River and at Lake Kampeska. Many roads, especially gravel roads, throughout Codington county were flooded and damaged. The Big Sioux River near Watertown rose to 11.5 feet, 2.5 feet above flood stage, with Lake Kampeska rising to around 4 feet overfull. As a result of the flooding on the Big Sioux River, 300 people in Watertown were evacuated and were not allowed to return until the 22nd. Also, several streets were closed in Watertown due to the flooding. Hundreds of National Guardsmen, volunteers, prison inmates, and city and emergency crews sandbagged along the Big Sioux River and Lake Kampeska to divert any flooding. A bridge on the Big Sioux River buckled due to large pieces of ice slamming into it. As Lake Kampeska rose, nearly 100 homes had to be evacuated along with 3 major businesses. 30 homes and 2 businesses along the lake were flooded resulting in extensive damage. Lake Pelican also rose to way overfull, flooding several homes and roads.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 90 (1895) Aberdeen: 4 (1936)
Kennebec: 88 (1988) Kennebec: 5 (1936)
Mobridge: 86 (1988) Mobridge: 2 (2008)
Pierre: 88 (1988) Pierre: 8 (1936)
Sisseton: 83 (1988) Sisseton: -3 (1936)
Timber Lake: 85 (1970) Timber Lake: -2 (1936)
Watertown: 82 (1988) Watertown: 0 (1936)
Wheaton: 82 (1988) Wheaton: 13 (1997)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.94" (1922) Aberdeen: 6.0" (1923)
Kennebec: 1.27" (2001) Kennebec: 4.0" (2003)
Mobridge: 1.10" (1919) Mobridge: 11.0" (1919)
Pierre: 0.85" (1919) Pierre: 3.0" (1982)
Sisseton: 1.22" (1904) Sisseton: Trace (missing)
Timber Lake: 2.20" (1915) Timber Lake: 2.0" (1982)
Watertown: 0.95" (1921) Watertown: 2.5" (1935)
Wheaton: 2.02" (2001) Wheaton: 3.7" (2008)


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