This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 23 April 1792 → John Thomas Romney Robinson, inventor of the cup anemometer, was born.
 23 April 1908 → An extensive tornado outbreak began around noon today in Minnesota, and wouldn't end until the evening of the 25th in Georgia. The strongest tornado of the event was an F5 (estimated) near Pender, NE today where a farm was swept away and debris was found 35 miles distant.
 23 April 1910 → The temperature at the Civic Center in Los Angeles hit 100 degrees to establish an April record for the city.
 23 April 1988 → In southern California, a winter-like storm brought thunderstorms. Nine girls in Tustin were injured when lightning struck the tree they were standing under to shield themselves from the rain.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


August 1, 1978:

A severe thunderstorm developed in west central Beadle County during the afternoon hours and moved southeast. High winds near 80 mph and hail up to golf ball size pelted several counties along the storm path. Hail piled up to six inches deep and up to three feet in ditches. Hail remained visible in some areas up to thirty six hours after the storm passed. Approximately 480,000 acres of crops were badly damaged or completely destroyed. Damage to crops and personal property were estimated to be nearly four million dollars.

August 1, 1983:

During the early afternoon hours, a strong microburst swept across Andrews Air Force Base in Washington, D.C. Although the base anemometer was not calibrated at extreme wind speeds, the peak gust hit 149 mph. It was reported that Air Force One, with President Reagan on board, landed less than 10 minutes prior to the peak gust.

August 1, 2000:

A severe thunderstorm produced large hail up to golf ball size and damaging winds estimated at 90 to 110 mph across northeastern Wyoming and western South Dakota during the evening hours. The Northern foothills of the Black Hills and the communities of Spearfish and Sturgis received the brunt of the storm. Considerable F0 and F1 wind damage (90 to110 mph) occurred in and around Spearfish. The strong winds blew down trees, business and road signs, and damaged tents for the 60th Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, destroying vendor merchandise and mobile homes.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 111 (1900) Aberdeen: 44 (1948)
Kennebec: 110 (1955) Kennebec: 42 (1925)
Mobridge: 107 (1936) Mobridge: 40 (1927)
Pierre: 109 (1943) Pierre: 49 (2009)
Sisseton: 101 (1988) Sisseton: 42 (1973)
Timber Lake: 107 (1936) Timber Lake: 44 (2009)
Watertown: 102 (1930) Watertown: 40 (1927)
Wheaton: 103 (1988) Wheaton: 42 (1927)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.96" (1942)
Kennebec: 1.19" (1970)
Mobridge: 1.57" (1914)
Pierre: 1.60" (1970)
Sisseton: 1.71" (1964)
Timber Lake: 1.41" (1987)
Watertown: 1.45" (1940)
Wheaton: 2.03" (1975)


USA.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal to all federal, state and local government web resources and services.