This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 23 October 1091 → England's earliest known tornado was also one of its strongest on record. It has been rated as an EF4, and devastated central London. The church at St. Mary le Bow was badly damaged with four rafters, each 26 feet long, driven 22 feet into the ground. Other churches in the area were demolished, as were over 600 houses. London Bridge was destroyed.
 23 October 1761 → A violent hurricane struck New England, causing tremendous damage in Rhode Island and Massachusetts.
 23 October 1920 → Tetsuya Fujita, inventor of the Fujita Scale, was born.
 23 October 2002 → Visibility was reduced to less than 100 meters during the Australian Dust Storm. It was the worst dust storm in 30 years.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


August 3, 1984:

During the morning hours, estimated four to six inches of rain fell from west of Garden City in Clark County to north of Henry in Codington County. Low lying areas were flooded and a potato field west of Garden City was washed out.

August 3, 1989:

Strong thunderstorm winds gusted to 70 mph, driving golf ball size hail through most the windows on the west side of buildings in Amherst, Marshall County. Corn crops were stripped off their leaves with an estimated 1800 acres being badly damaged.

August 3, 1996:

High winds up to 90 mph uprooted and damaged many trees in Mobridge. Several power lines and poles were downed from trees falling onto them. The roofs of two buildings were blown off while other roofs received some damage. Windows were broken out in eight vehicles at the South Dakota Department of Transportation from gravel blown from a stockpile. Winds up to 90 mph also caused damage in Herreid were doors on a concrete elevator were blown out.

August 3, 2008:

A couple severe thunderstorms moved across north central South Dakota during the early morning hours bringing large hail and damaging thunderstorm winds to the area. Isabel, Timber Lake, and Selby were among the hardest hit locations. Isabel in Dewey County saw eighty mph winds which damaged or downed several trees, damaged carnival equipment, destroyed some sheds, and rolled some large hay bales. Winds up to 80 mph severely damaged a barn, downed some power poles along with many trees and branches in and around Timber Lake. Also, several vehicles and many acres of crops were damaged by the hail and high winds. The Little Moreau Elk Lodge roof was damaged and some windows were broken. One-hundred mph winds downed six power poles and caused considerable damage to sunflowers, corn, wheat, and beans in and around Selby in Walworth County. Also, an empty grain bin was blown over and damaged. Numerous trees were snapped off. The coop seed building in Selby sustained considerable damage with many trees uprooted or damaged throughout town.

August 3, 2009:

A cold front moving southeast across the area brought many severe thunderstorms to parts of central and northeast South Dakota. Large hail up to golf ball size along with wind gusts nearing 80 mph occurred across the area. Brown, Hyde, Lyman, and Gregory Counties were among the hardest hit locations. Many acres of soybeans and corn were significantly damaged by hail and sixty mph winds near Putney in Brown County. Seventy to 80 mph winds brought down several large trees along with many large tree branches in and around Highmore in Hyde County. The strong winds also tipped over a semi, a gravity wagon, and a grain auger along with damaging several fences. There were also power outages in Highmore. Golf ball size hail combined with strong winds broke many windows in the house and dented several vehicles south of Kennebec in Lyman County. The house pet was also injured. Large hail, up to two inches in diameter, fell in a swath a few miles wide from northwestern to south central Gregory County. The hail broke numerous windows, severely damaged siding and roofs of homes and other buildings, and severely damaged vehicles, while covering the ground in several places. Property damage was especially severe in the town of Gregory. Crop damage was also severe along the swath, with corn crops in some areas destroyed to the point of only small stubble left.

August 3, 2010:

A strong upper level disturbance produced heavy rain around Lead, Deadwood, and Central City. Four to five inches of rain fell in two hours, causing widespread street flooding in Lead and Deadwood. Six to 12 inches of water flowing down Main and Sherman Streets in Deadwood flooded cars, basements, and businesses. The electrical system of the Broadway Parking Ramp elevator was destroyed. Hail broke windows of a basement pub, which then filled with water about three and a half feet deep.

August 3, 2012:

An area of low pressure and associated cold front moving across South Dakota produced many severe thunderstorms. Tennis ball size hail and damaging wind gusts up to eighty mph along with a few tornadoes were reported. In Walworth County, tennis ball hail destroyed crops near Sitka. Hail up to golf ball size lasted ten minutes near Java. Near Loyalton Edmunds County, windows and vinyl siding on the west side of a house were destroyed due to seventy mph winds and golf ball size hail. The wind and hail also damaged the west side of a barn and severely damaged the bean and corn crops. The emergency manager in Spink County reported large branches downed due to estimated wind gusts of seventy to eighty mph in Redfield. Also in Spink County, a brief, EF0 tornado touchdown in a cornfield near the airport in Redfield. Another weak, EF0, touched down in a cornfield three miles southwest of Conde. In Hamlin County, the storms produced eighty mph winds which downed between thirty and forty trees in Castlewood and Hayti causing many power outages.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 107 (1947) Aberdeen: 39 (1971)
Kennebec: 111 (1980) Kennebec: 40 (1978)
Mobridge: 109 (1947) Mobridge: 46 (1978)
Pierre: 110 (1947) Pierre: 42 (1978)
Sisseton: 101 (1959) Sisseton: 43 (1978)
Timber Lake: 109 (1947) Timber Lake: 38 (1978)
Watertown: 104 (1930) Watertown: 38 (1971)
Wheaton: 102 (1958) Wheaton: 40 (1971)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.81" (1953)
Kennebec: 2.25" (2007)
Mobridge: 1.34" (1981)
Pierre: 2.36" (2007)
Sisseton: 2.33" (1953)
Timber Lake: 1.97" (1987)
Watertown: 1.78" (1984)
Wheaton: 1.88" (1940)


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