This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 21 September 1588 → After an unsuccessful battle with the English fleet, the Spanish Armada encountered strong storms and high winds off the coast of Ireland on its way back to Spain. 26 ships are believed to have been lost. The remaining ships limped back to Spain defeated and demoralized, ending the reign of the once unbeatable Spanish Armada.
 21 September 1894 → A huge tornado outbreak swept from Iowa through Minnesota to Wisconsin, with an unusual number of extremely violent tornadoes. The tornado that rampaged through Kossuth County, MN, was likely an F5 as homes and farms were wiped clean from the earth.
 21 September 1909 → A category 3 hurricane crossed the Gulf of Mexico and came ashore in southern Louisiana. The storm inflicted 120 mph winds on southeast Louisiana and took its storm surge 2 miles inland. There were about 371 fatalities despite the Weather Bureau having issued its first warnings for the storm three days earlier.
 21 September 1938 → The New England Hurricane was one of the most destructive and powerful storms ever to strike southern New England. The storm roared ashore over Long Island, NY at nearly 60 mph at the time of high tide. This created a deadly tidal surge, which submerged downtown Providence, RI under 20 feet of water. Hurricane force winds were felt throughout New England, with a gust to 186 mph at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, MA. The Great New England Hurricane of 1938 was responsible for over 500 deaths.

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August 6, 1962:

Wind damaged farm buildings and hail damaged crops over a large area. The area affected was northern Faulk, portions of Spink, Northern Clark, Codington, and Grant, along with Day County.

August 6, 1969:

During the day and evening hours, two relatively large storms brought destructive weather to much of Minnesota. The northerly storm area moved in from North Dakota between Fargo and Grand Forks. The southern storm rapidly developed north of Wedena. These two storms combined to cause twelve tornadoes, two large areas of wind and hail damage, and one waterspout. The storms killed 15 people, injured 106, and caused 4.8 million dollars in property and public utility damage.

August 6, 1986:

A severe thunderstorm brought extensive damage in Winner in Tripp county. The storm packed 90 mile an hour winds and damaged over 200 houses in Winner. The Tripp County Historical Museum was completely destroyed. Extensive tree damage occurred in town and a plane was flipped over at the airport.

August 6, 1999:

The first report of high winds was southeast of Piedmont with gusts of 65 to 70 mph estimated by a National Weather Service employee. Damage in that area included several downed trees and leveled gardens. As the storm moved east, large hail was reported. The first wind gust at Ellsworth AFB was 89 mph at 1918 MST on the northwest end of the runway. By 1925 MST, sustained winds were over 50 mph for nearly 10 minutes and the peak gust was 114 mph. The sensor on the southeast end of the runway, 2.5 miles away, recorded a wind gust of 114 mph at 1929 MST. The damage on the base included several large trees blown over and snapped in half and roof damage to base housing units. A few tents set up on the taxiways for an air show were blown around, but not significantly damaged. A survey by base meteorologists indicated the main downburst winds hit over open prairie surrounding the runway, where there are no trees or structures. Also between 1920 and 1930 MST, a meteorology student estimated winds between 70 and 80 mph at Box Elder, where gardens were leveled and wooden fences and roofs were damaged.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 108 (1941) Aberdeen: 44 (1902)
Kennebec: 112 (1980) Kennebec: 46 (1993)
Mobridge: 106 (1941) Mobridge: 47 (1993)
Pierre: 109 (1980) Pierre: 49 (1993)
Sisseton: 100 (1933) Sisseton: 45 (1902)
Timber Lake: 105 (1949) Timber Lake: 47 (1926)
Watertown: 103 (1933) Watertown: 38 (1902)
Wheaton: 99 (1968) Wheaton: 47 (1917)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.40" (1964)
Kennebec: 1.73" (1906)
Mobridge: 1.95" (1911)
Pierre: 1.84" (1897)
Sisseton: 3.02" (1967)
Timber Lake: 1.03" (1950)
Watertown: 1.95" (1900)
Wheaton: 2.41" (2004)


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