This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 28 July 1945 → A B-25 bomber crashed into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building due to reduced visibility from thick fog. Three people on the plane and 11 people in the building were killed. A million dollars damage was done though the building's integrity was not compromised.
 28 July 1952 → A severe storm with hail up to an inch and a half in diameter broke windows, ruined roofs, and stripped trees of leaves near Benson, AZ. The temperature dropped to 37 degrees, and hail was three to four inches deep with drifts 46 inches high.
 28 July 1997 → Fort Collins, CO was inundated by a flood that sent a 20-foot wall of water rushing through the city. Five people died.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


August 14, 1898:

A deadly, estimated F4 tornado moved southeast from 12 miles northwest of Clear Lake, passing 7 miles north of town and ending about 4 miles west of Gary. Deaths occurred on two farms. One man was killed when the kitchen of his farm house was torn off. Five members of one family were killed along with two labors on another farm as every building was swept away. Buildings suffered heavy damage on eight farms. This was one of the earliest, estimated F4 tornadoes on record for South Dakota.

August 14, 2008:

Several severe thunderstorms developed along a cold front across parts of central and northeast South Dakota. Large hail, some flash flooding, and a couple of weak tornadoes occurred with these storms. An EF0 tornado touched down briefly at the Brown County fairgrounds, blowing over several tents and awnings. Another EF0 tornado touched down briefly in an open field causing no damage north of Stephan in Hyde County.

August 14, 2009:

A warm front brought severe thunderstorms with large hail up to the size of golf balls along with sixty mph winds to parts of north central and northeast South Dakota. In addition, very heavy rain fell across western Brown County with 2 to 4 inches of rain reported. This heavy rain brought flash flooding conditions. Numerous county roads and area fields were overrun with flowing water. The water level on Richmond Lake rose nearly a foot a day after the event from high inflows. This rapid rise in the lake level resulted in numerous boat and fishing docks being submerged. Several boats were also trapped under lift canopies due to the high water. There were reports of several boats breaking free of their mooring and floating toward the spillway.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 104 (1952) Aberdeen: 38 (1968)
Kennebec: 111 (1935) Kennebec: 40 (1929)
Mobridge: 109 (1935) Mobridge: 35 (1929)
Pierre: 114 (1937) Pierre: 44 (2004)
Sisseton: 100 (1952) Sisseton: 39 (1968)
Timber Lake: 107 (1937) Timber Lake: 39 (1929)
Watertown: 100 (1928) Watertown: 38 (1929)
Wheaton: 102 (1965) Wheaton: 40 (1968)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.25" (1908)
Kennebec: 0.82" (1908)
Mobridge: 1.34" (1951)
Pierre: 2.00" (1951)
Sisseton: 0.88" (1934)
Timber Lake: 1.46" (1949)
Watertown: 2.20" (1993)
Wheaton: 1.46" (1948)


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