This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 1 February 1951 → One of the worst ice storms ever to hit the United States deposited a glaze up to four inches thick from Texas to Pennsylvania. The storm caused 25 deaths, 500 serious injuries, and $100 million damage. Tennessee was hardest hit by the storm. Communications and utilities were interrupted for up to ten days.
 1 February 1953 → An intense low pressure system swept across the North Sea. Wind speeds at Aberdeen, Scotland exceeded 125 mph. A storm surge of 13 feet breached dams in the Netherlands, flooding 4 million acres, or one-sixth of the country.
 1 February 1972 → A blizzard in Iran ended a four year drought, but a full week of cold and snow caused the deaths of approximately 4,000 people.
 1 February 2011 → An immense blizzard dropped as much as two feet of snow from Tulsa through southwest Missouri, northeast Missouri, central Illinois, northern Illinois, southeastern Wisconsin, to Lower Michigan. The northern suburbs of Chicago received 21 inches, and the Chicago lakefront recorded 70 mph winds!

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


August 17, 1961:

Heavy rain was observed during the overnight hours on the 17th through the early morning hours on the 18th. Some rainfall amounts include, 4.13 inches in Clark, 2.52 inches 1 W of Summit, 2.50 in Andover, 2.20 in Waubay, 2.15 in Wilmot, 2.12 in Wheaton, and 2.10 in Clear Lake.

August 17, 2007:

An estimated four to six inches of rain and hail to the size of baseballs caused localized flooding between Piedmont and Tilford in Meade County, especially near poor drainage areas and at a barricade along a frontage road. The water washed over several roads and was several inches deep over Interstate 90, forcing law enforcement officials to close it for a couple of hours. Heavy rain estimated at four to six inches fell west of Hermosa in Custer County between 6 pm and 8 pm MST. Battle and Grace Coolidge Creeks overflowed their banks and several dry canyons filled with water and drained into the creeks. State highways 40 and 36 were flooded in numerous spots. A river gauge on Battle Creek just east of Hermosa crested at 14.91 feet at 9 pm, rising from 2.63 ft at 7:30 pm and above the flood stage of 8.0 feet. About six inches of water covered Highway 79 at the Battle Creek bridge. A railroad bridge about 3/4 mile downstream became clogged with debris and water rose behind the embankment and flooded six homes. At about 8:30 pm MST, a section of the embankment failed, flooding a new subdivision on the other side. All of the approximately 20 houses were damaged; three homes were washed off their foundations, and one of those houses was carried a half a mile east of the subdivision by the flowing water. There were no injuries.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 104 (1976) Aberdeen: 39 (2012)
Kennebec: 107 (1973) Kennebec: 37 (1943)
Mobridge: 105 (2003) Mobridge: 39 (1943)
Pierre: 108 (1976) Pierre: 41 (2012)
Sisseton: 102 (1976) Sisseton: 42 (2012)
Timber Lake: 105 (1973) Timber Lake: 41 (1944)
Watertown: 98 (1976) Watertown: 39 (1943)
Wheaton: 103 (1988) Wheaton: 45 (1963)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 3.25" (1990)
Kennebec: 1.33" (1930)
Mobridge: 4.43" (2007)
Pierre: 0.71" (1940)
Sisseton: 1.87" (2005)
Timber Lake: 1.21" (1940)
Watertown: 1.60" (2005)
Wheaton: 1.50" (1948)


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