This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 28 December 1879 → All 74 lives were lost when a passenger train plunged from the Tay Bridge (Dundee, Scotland) into the Tay Estuary as the middle section of the bridge collapsed. Although the bridge was poorly constructed and had already been weakened in earlier gales (including the pre-existing winds at the time of the tragedy), the ultimate failure is believed to have been caused by two or three waterspouts which were sighted close to the bridge immediately before the accident.
 28 December 1999 → From the 26th to the 28th two incredibly powerful wind storms tore through northern and western Europe. Winds were over 100 mph in France, Germany, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Devastation to trees, power grids, and buildings was widespread. 140 people lost their lives.
 28 December 2003 → A severe snow storm hit northern California and southern Oregon. As much as 2 feet of snow fell along Interstate 5 closing a 150-mile stretch of the highway, stranding hundreds of travelers. Winds from the storm caused power outages to more than 200,000 customers. One man died of a heart attack after helping other drivers.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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August 24, 1960:

A man was injured when a barn was blown over by an F2 tornado that touched down near Hayes, in Stanley County. Hail, up to golf ball size accompanied the storm as well as about three inches of rain, causing some damage to crops and a farm house. The sky color in a westerly direction shortly before the tornado hit was described as a distinct shade of green. Evidence suggests that the tornado may have touched down again in northeast Sully County, destroying a barn, a chicken coop, and hay stacks on two farms. Also, precipitation generally in excess of 3 inches and locally 6 to 8 inches was accompanied by severe hail, causing damage to buildings and crops. Hail damage was heaviest in Stanly County. Wind carried away an estimated 400 tons of balled hay in Haakon County. A measured rainfall amount of 5.1 inches in less than six hours occurred in Onida, causing extensive flooding of basements, streets, and cropland. Some other rain fall amounts include 5.58 inches 4 NW of Onida, 4.50 inches 23 N of Highmore, 3.05 inches 2N of Onaka, 3.42 inches in Clear Lake, 3.11 inches in Miller, 3.02 inches in Eureka, 2.55 inches 1 NW of Faulkton, 2.40 inches in Gettysburg, 2.22 inches in Blunt, 2.20 inches at Oahe Dam, and 2.16 inches in Clark.

August 24, 1992:

Hurricane Andrew struck southeast Florida on this date with an estimated maximum sustained surface winds of 145 mph with gusts in excess of 175 mph. Andrew cross Florida and went on to strike south central Louisiana on August 26. Andrew was rated as a category 4 on the Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale, thus making it the first category 4 hurricane to strike the United States since Hugo in 1989. Prior to Hugo, Camille, a category 5 hurricane in August 1969, was the last hurricane rated 4 of higher to strike the United States. Damage resulting from Andrew estimated at 20 to 25 billion billions, making it the most expensive natural disasters in United States history.

August 24, 1998:

A line of severe thunderstorms moved rapidly southeast across Sully, Hyde, and Hand counties during the morning hours, producing destructive winds up to 100 mph and hail up to the size of baseballs. The winds and hail damaged or destroyed a wide swath of sunflowers and corn. Four highline power poles south of Highmore on Highway 47 were snapped off. The school in Highmore had twenty screens shredded by the hail and the winds. On a farm northeast of Onida, a grain bin was blown over a distance of 200 yards.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 103 (1929) Aberdeen: 38 (1934)
Kennebec: 106 (1936) Kennebec: 39 (1928)
Mobridge: 102 (1991) Mobridge: 38 (1928)
Pierre: 107 (2001) Pierre: 42 (1934)
Sisseton: 98 (1976) Sisseton: 37 (1934)
Timber Lake: 98 (1991) Timber Lake: 37 (1934)
Watertown: 105 (1936) Watertown: 34 (1934)
Wheaton: 102 (1949) Wheaton: 38 (1923)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.03" (1960)
Kennebec: 1.20" (1982)
Mobridge: 0.95" (1995)
Pierre: 2.12" (1903)
Sisseton: 1.31" (1995)
Timber Lake: 0.97" (1998)
Watertown: 0.71" (1941)
Wheaton: 1.84" (1995)


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