This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 23 April 1792 → John Thomas Romney Robinson, inventor of the cup anemometer, was born.
 23 April 1908 → An extensive tornado outbreak began around noon today in Minnesota, and wouldn't end until the evening of the 25th in Georgia. The strongest tornado of the event was an F5 (estimated) near Pender, NE today where a farm was swept away and debris was found 35 miles distant.
 23 April 1910 → The temperature at the Civic Center in Los Angeles hit 100 degrees to establish an April record for the city.
 23 April 1988 → In southern California, a winter-like storm brought thunderstorms. Nine girls in Tustin were injured when lightning struck the tree they were standing under to shield themselves from the rain.

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December 23, 1984:

Snow fell over the western third of South Dakota on the 23rd, with amounts ranging from 2-16 inches. The northwest received the most snow, with amounts generally 4-8 inches, though Buffalo (Harding County) reported 16 inches, and Custer (Custer County) 11 inches. Several accidents were reported as a result. The heaviest snow reported in the current Aberdeen forecast area was 3 inches at Eagle Butte.

December 23, 1987:

Five to sixteen inches of snow fell in 24 hours in east central and southeast South Dakota from the morning of the 23rd through the morning of the 24th. Some of the larger amounts measured were 9 inches at Huron, 10 inches at Mitchell, Platte and Brookings, twelve inches at Chamberlain, and sixteen inches at Alpena. Heavy snow also fell in southwestern Minnesota, with Big Stone and Traverse Counties in the west central portion of the state missing out on the heaviest snow. Considerable blowing and drifting snow hampered removal, particularly in South Dakota, due to reduced visibilities. Snowfall amounts also included three inches at Castlewood, five inches at Clear Lake, and six inches at Bryant.

December 23, 1996:

Blizzard conditions developed across northeast South Dakota and west central Minnesota in the late afternoon of the 23rd and continued into the late evening. Visibilities were frequently below one quarter of a mile. Two to six inches of new snowfall combined with the already significant snow cover and north winds of 20 to 40 mph to cause widespread blizzard conditions and heavy drifting on area roads. Travel was significantly impacted if not impossible, and one fatality resulted from a head-on collision. Some snowfall amounts in Minnesota included 5 inches at Artichoke Lake and 6 inches at Wheaton and Browns Valley. In South Dakota, 7 inches fell at Britton, Webster, and Clear Lake, with 6 inches at Sisseton and 5 inches at Summit.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 54 (1893) Aberdeen: -34 (1983)
Kennebec: 62 (1983) Kennebec: -31 (1983)
Mobridge: 54 (1950) Mobridge: -33 (1983)
Pierre: 58 (1950) Pierre: -26 (1990)
Sisseton: 48 (1994) Sisseton: -28 (1983)
Timber Lake: 55 (1936) Timber Lake: -31 (1983)
Watertown: 51 (1899) Watertown: -30 (1983)
Wheaton: 51 (1986) Wheaton: -30 (1983)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.36" (2010) Aberdeen: 3.6" (2010)
Kennebec: 0.23" (1939) Kennebec: 5.0" (1987)
Mobridge: 0.28" (1972) Mobridge: 4.8" (1969)
Pierre: 0.25" (2010) Pierre: 2.6" (2010)
Sisseton: 0.28" (2010) Sisseton: 3.8" (2010)
Timber Lake: 0.76" (2010) Timber Lake: 6.0" (1918)
Watertown: 0.23" (1945) Watertown: 4.3" (1945)
Wheaton: 0.40" (1945) Wheaton: 2.0" (2001)


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