This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 25 October 1805 → Snow began falling in west central Indiana during the afternoon and continued into the next day. At Fort Wayne, IN the snowfall reached a foot in depth.
 25 October 1859 → The sinking of the British ship The Royal Charter in 1859 began a string of ships damaged by severe weather, which led to the issuance of gale warnings in England the following year.
 25 October 1921 → A hurricane made landfall at Tarpon Springs, FL, as a Category 3 (after weakening from a Category 4), causing several million dollars in damage.
 25 October 1977 → Dutch Harbor, AK set the U.S. record for lowest barometric pressure in a non-tropical storm: 27.35 inches.
 25 October 1992 → The final tropical storm of the season, Zeke, was born in the eastern Pacific. It broke the record for the most named storms in one year in that region.

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February 1, 1969:

Across central and eastern South Dakota, February 1969 contained a variety of winter weather causing many difficulties. Glazing due to heavy fog and drizzle periodically formed on utility lines causing numerous broken power lines. Periodically, strong winds caused widespread blowing and drifting snow resulting in many closed roads. Snowplows would open the roads and often drifting snow would close the roads again. Frequent uses of pusher type snowplows piled banks of snow 20 to 30 feet along the roads and it became impractical to open roads with this type of snowplow. Several rotary snowplows were flown in from military airbases outside of the state to open some of the roads in the eastern part of the state. Numerous school closings occurred during the month due to snow blocked roads.

February 1, 1989:

Four to eight inches of snow fell across western and northern South Dakota. Winds of 25 mph and subzero temperature produced wind chills in the 50 to 80 below zero range. Several schools were closed across the area due to the dangerous wind chills. The storm continued into the 2nd.

February 1, 1996:

Bitterly cold Arctic air combined with north winds of 5 to 20 mph to produce record low temperatures and extreme wind chills across northeast South Dakota and west central Minnesota. Wind chills ranged from 50 below to 70 below with actual temperatures ranging from 20 below to 40 below on the morning of the first. Aberdeen had a record low of 36 below that morning. Then, as the north winds increased to 15 to 25 mph, the wind chills fell to 60 below to 80 below by late afternoon and during the night. Wind speeds decreased by the late morning of the second, allowing wind chills to rise to the 40 below to 60 below range. By 4 pm cst, the winds had decreased enough to keep wind chills in the 20 below to 40 below range.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 58 (1931) Aberdeen: -42 (1893)
Kennebec: 65 (1992) Kennebec: -33 (1905)
Mobridge: 60 (1934) Mobridge: -32 (1996)
Pierre: 65 (1934) Pierre: -27 (1996)
Sisseton: 49 (1991) Sisseton: -31 (1996)
Timber Lake: 68 (2006) Timber Lake: -27 (1996)
Watertown: 58 (1931) Watertown: -36 (1893)
Wheaton: 51(1931) Wheaton: -32 (1996)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.60" (1922) Aberdeen: 8.1" (1939)
Kennebec: 0.30" (1939) Kennebec: 4.0" (1939)
Mobridge: 0.34" (1939) Mobridge: 5.0" (1939)
Pierre: 0.42" (1939) Pierre: 5.5" (1939)
Sisseton: 0.66" (1939) Sisseton: 8.0" (1939)
Timber Lake: 0.48" (1939) Timber Lake: 4.5" (1939)
Watertown: 0.56" (1939) Watertown: 7.0" (1939)
Wheaton: 0.64" (1939) Wheaton: 5.0" (1967)


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