This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 20 April 1920 → Tornadoes struck Mississippi and Alabama, killing 219 people. One F4 touched down in eastern Mississippi and then stayed on the ground for 130 miles, tearing through Marion, Franklin, and Colbert Counties in Alabama. Another F4 destroyed homes in the communities of Gurley and Brownsboro.
 20 April 1990 → Lightning struck a building housing a fish farm in Arkansas, killing 10,000 pounds of fish.

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February 4, 1984:

A fast moving blizzard pounded the northeast and east central with light snow and raging winds. Snow amounts were generally less than 2 inches regionwide. As the storm progressed, temperatures dropped thirty degrees in three hours as winds gusted to 70 mph. Fierce winds struck quickly, plummeting visibilities to zero and making travel difficult in a matter of minutes. No travel was advised across much of the area. Hundreds of travelers became stranded in the white-out and the highway crews were pulled of the road to wait for decreasing winds. There were also some spotty power outages.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 55 (2005) Aberdeen: -36 (1893)
Kennebec: 69 (2005) Kennebec: -29 (1902)
Mobridge: 62 (2005) Mobridge: -27 (1982)
Pierre: 66 (2005) Pierre: -22 (1996)
Sisseton: 53 (2005) Sisseton: -25 (1996)
Timber Lake: 68 (2005) Timber Lake: -28 (1936)
Watertown: 59 (2005) Watertown: -28 (1893)
Wheaton: 54 (1991) Wheaton: -24 (1996)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.45" (1897) Aberdeen: 5.3" (1980)
Kennebec: 0.28" (1997) Kennebec: 5.0" (1997)
Mobridge: 0.24" (1980) Mobridge: 2.2" (1955)
Pierre: 0.22" (1986) Pierre: 2.5" (1997)
Sisseton: 0.26" (1955) Sisseton: 4.0" (1980)
Timber Lake: 0.21" (1916) Timber Lake: 4.0" (1916)
Watertown: 0.29" (1980) Watertown: 6.0" (1997)
Wheaton: 0.35" (1997) Wheaton: 5.0" (1997)


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