This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 28 November 1905 → Sailors on a ship that got stuck 100 miles off the shore of Lake Superior near Duluth, MN froze to death.
 28 November 1941 → 347 houses were damaged or destroyed by a tornado in Toyohashi, Japan, southwest of Tokyo. A dozen people were killed.
 28 November 1960 → A winter storm produced 20 to 40 foot waves on Lake Superior near Duluth. Duluth was buried by a foot of snow whipped by 70 mph winds. Property along the north shore of the lake was flooded and battered by high winds. Thousands of cords of hardwood were washed into the lake and up to 3 feet of water flooded the main street of Grand Marais, WI.
 28 November 1979 → A sightseeing tour of Antarctica turned into tragedy as a DC-10 filled with 237 passengers and 20 crewmembers crashed into the slopes of Mount Erebus. Low clouds and whiteout conditions forced pilots to rely on instrumentation and an incorrect flight plan which flew the plane into the side of Mount Erebus.

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February 17, 1962:

Very heavy snow of 20 to 30 inches fell across the southeastern half of South Dakota. One location had 44 inches of snowfall from the storm. Everything was shutdown due to the storm including roads, schools, and businesses. Some snowfall amounts included, 10 inches at Bryant, 11 inches at Miller, 20 inches at Mitchell, 21 inches at Redfield, 23 inches at Huron, and 32 inches at Sioux Falls.

February 17, 1972:

In Minnesota, strong winds of 30 to 50 mph across southern and central Minnesota reduced visibilities to zero at times from blowing snow. Wind gusts of 90 mph were reported at Worthington and Fairmont. Snow of 2 to 6 inches fell across the state. The blizzard stopped almost all traffic from west-central through the south-central part of the state. Most schools in the area closed. Dozens to hundreds of people were stranded in almost every town. Many communities stopped all traffic from leaving town. A train was derailed by the snow at Butterfield. There were many auto accidents. In South Dakota, freezing rain followed by snow accompanied by winds of over 60 mph produced hazardous driving conditions in the area. Traffic was brought to a standstill in many areas resulting in cancellations of school and other activities. A number of accidents occurred due to the icy roads. Although the snowfall was light, strong winds caused drifting with visibilities to near zero at times.

February 17, 1991:

On February 17th, a major snowstorm dumped huge amounts of snow on the most of the state from the Black Hills, southwest, central, east central, and the northeast. At the end of the storm, parts of the black hills received up to 2 feet of snow while the rest of affected area had between 8 and 15 inches. The heavy snow caused most of Interstate 90 west of the Missouri River to close, as well as many other highways in the central part of the state. Many cars and trucks skidded off the highways, causing many minor injuries. The only serious injury was a man rolled his car over after losing control near Belvidere.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 67 (1913) Aberdeen: -39 (1903)
Kennebec: 71 (1913) Kennebec: -28 (1913)
Mobridge: 63 (1954) Mobridge: -26 (1936)
Pierre: 63 (2002) Pierre: -23 (1956)
Sisseton: 61 (1981) Sisseton: -28 (1936)
Timber Lake: 66 (1913) Timber Lake: -28 (1936)
Watertown: 55 (1981) Watertown: -27 (1936)
Wheaton: 59 (1981) Wheaton: -26 (1979)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.32" (1952) Aberdeen: 3.0" (1952)
Kennebec: 0.68" (1991) Kennebec: 10.3" (1962)
Mobridge: 0.29" (1991) Mobridge: 3.0" (1991)
Pierre: 0.88" (1991) Pierre: 9.2" (1991)
Sisseton: 0.37" (1998) Sisseton: 2.7" (1901)
Timber Lake: 0.37" (1950) Timber Lake: 4.0" (1991)
Watertown: 0.25" (1962) Watertown: 3.0" (1908)
Wheaton: 0.35" (1998) Wheaton: 1.9" (2007)


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