This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 9 July 1979 → A thunderstorm pelted Midland, TX with golfball-sized hail piling up over a foot deep. Winds howled up to 75 mph, and the temperature dropped from 101 to 56 degrees in 15 minutes! Other storms struck Foard and Wilbarger counties in north Texas. Near Vernon, 80 MPH winds blew cars off Highway 287, while in Foard County Highway 70 was temporarily closed when a tractor trailer was blown over onto its side. A second tractor trailer was turned over near Crowell by winds estimated at 80 MPH.
 9 July 1982 → A Boeing 727 crashed in Kenner, LA. Pan Am Flight 759 took off during a thunderstorm and flew into wind shear, probably a microburst. All 145 people on board died and 8 people on the ground were killed as the plane crashed into a neighborhood, destroying six homes.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


January 6, 1962:

Snow, strong winds, and sub-zero temperatures along with near blizzard conditions caused hazardous driving conditions across the area from the 6th into the 9th. Snowfall of generally 2 to 6 inches with winds of 30 to 40 mph caused widespread low visibilities along with drifts up to 4 foot high across central and northeast South Dakota.

January 6, 1989:

Heavy snowfall of 8 to 12 inches with local amounts of 24 to 26 inches fell in northern Minnesota the 6th through the 8th. The heavy snow was followed by an Arctic intrusion which brought in 35 to 50 mph winds. This caused a shutdown the Red River Valley. Snowdrifts were from 5 to 10 feet in some areas. Roads had to be closed. The strong winds caused near-blizzard conditions along with extremely low wind chills.

January 6, 2010:

A strong Alberta Clipper low pressure system tracked southeast through the northern plains on Tuesday night, January 5th through Wednesday, January 6th. Sufficient Pacific moisture interacted with bitter cold Arctic air surging south from Canada resulting in widespread snowfall over much of central and northeast South Dakota. Snowfall amounts generally ranged from 2 to 11 inches of fluffy snow. The snowfall began across central and northeast South Dakota from the late afternoon through the late evening of the 5th. As the system tracked east, behind it strong north to northwest winds gusted to as high as 50 mph resulting in widespread blizzard conditions with near whiteout conditions at times. In fact, Interstate 90 across Jones and Lyman counties was closed for a time due to poor travel conditions. Schools throughout the region were also closed on the 6th, with some closed on the 7th. While there were several accidents reported, none resulted in major injures. The snow along with the strong winds also collapsed a hay shed. Some snowfall amounts included, 2 inches at Blunt and Timber Lake; 4 inches at Gettysburg and east of Hayes; 6 inches at Pierre, Andover and Doland, McLaughlin and Pollock; 7 inches at Britton, Sisseton, Gann Valley, Murdo, Eureka, Mobridge, Leola, Faulkton, and Ipswich; 8 inches in Aberdeen, Bryant, and near Summit; 9 inches near McIntosh and Roscoe, Wilmot and Castlewood; 10 inches in Clear Lake, and 11 inches at Watertown.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 49 (2012) Aberdeen: -30 (1909)
Kennebec: 65 (1935) Kennebec: -37 (1988)
Mobridge: 54 (1954) Mobridge: -39 (1912)
Pierre: 52 (1990) Pierre: -26 (1988)
Sisseton: 48 (2012) Sisseton: -26 (1951)
Timber Lake: 54 (1954) Timber Lake: -24 (1912)
Watertown: 45 (2012) Watertown: -29 (1909)
Wheaton: 58 (2012) Wheaton: -25 (1916)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.60" (1895) Aberdeen: 7.3" (2010)
Kennebec: 0.20" (2010) Kennebec: 3.0" (2010)
Mobridge: 0.28" (1967) Mobridge: 5.5" (1967)
Pierre: 0.25" (2010) Pierre: 5.4" (2010)
Sisseton: 0.48" (2010) Sisseton: 6.7" (2010)
Timber Lake: 0.13" (1967) Timber Lake: 5.0" (1967)
Watertown: 0.60" (1967) Watertown: 11.0" (2010)
Wheaton: 0.64" (1980) Wheaton: 7.0" (1989)


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