This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 25 October 1805 → Snow began falling in west central Indiana during the afternoon and continued into the next day. At Fort Wayne, IN the snowfall reached a foot in depth.
 25 October 1859 → The sinking of the British ship The Royal Charter in 1859 began a string of ships damaged by severe weather, which led to the issuance of gale warnings in England the following year.
 25 October 1921 → A hurricane made landfall at Tarpon Springs, FL, as a Category 3 (after weakening from a Category 4), causing several million dollars in damage.
 25 October 1977 → Dutch Harbor, AK set the U.S. record for lowest barometric pressure in a non-tropical storm: 27.35 inches.
 25 October 1992 → The final tropical storm of the season, Zeke, was born in the eastern Pacific. It broke the record for the most named storms in one year in that region.

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January 7, 1967:

Heavy snow and strong winds caused low visibilities in west central Minnesota from the 6th through the 7th. There were several accidents reported.

January 7, 1980:

A strong area of low pressure moved out of the northern Rockies across South Dakota and central Minnesota on January 6th and 7th. Heavy snow along with very high winds caused widespread blowing and drifting snow with low visibilities. Many roads were closed and many motorists were stranded. Snowfall amounts across western and northern Minnesota were from 7 to 12 inches.

January 7, 1989:

Five to nineteen inches of snow fell across northern and east central South Dakota on the 6th and 7th. Snow and blowing snow reduced visibilities to near zero in many locations as winds gusted to near 50 mph. Part of Interstate 29 north of Sisseton was closed the night of the 7th. Icy roads contributed to a school bus accident which injured 8 boys. Extreme wind chills of 30 to 60 below also occurred. Snowfall amounts included 8 inches in Sisseton, with 12 to 19 inches across Marshall and Roberts counties.

January 7, 2010:

Arctic high pressure combined with strong northwest winds resulting in extreme wind chills from 35 to nearly 50 degrees below zero across central and northeast South Dakota. Some of the lowest wind chills included, -40 in Aberdeen; -41 in Watertown; -42 in Highmore; -43 in Leola and Faulkton; -44 in Eagle Butte, Herreid, and Gettysburg; and -47 in Bowdle. Several record lows were also tied or broken during the morning hours of the 8th including, -22 degrees NW of Gann Valley and Victor; -23 degrees at Pierre and Sisseton; -24 degrees at Roscoe; and -34 degrees at Pollock.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 54 (1963) Aberdeen: -39 (1912)
Kennebec: 63 (2003) Kennebec: -37 (1912)
Mobridge: 58 (2003) Mobridge: -33 (1912)
Pierre: 61 (2003) Pierre: -24 (1942)
Sisseton: 54 (1963) Sisseton: -26 (1936)
Timber Lake: 55 (2003) Timber Lake: -30 (1912)
Watertown: 49 (1990) Watertown: -29 (1942)
Wheaton: 48 (1963) Wheaton: -25 (1982)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.46" (1992) Aberdeen: 4.3" (1992)
Kennebec: 0.48" (1992) Kennebec: 4.0" (1975)
Mobridge: 0.14" (1992) Mobridge: 1.8" (1992)
Pierre: 0.42" (1992) Pierre: 4.0" (1975)
Sisseton: 0.45" (1989) Sisseton: 7.0" (1989)
Timber Lake: 0.18" (1992) Timber Lake: 1.5" (1992)
Watertown: 0.26" (1975) Watertown: 2.6" (1975)
Wheaton: 0.59" (1989) Wheaton: 8.0" (1989)


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