This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 1 February 1951 → One of the worst ice storms ever to hit the United States deposited a glaze up to four inches thick from Texas to Pennsylvania. The storm caused 25 deaths, 500 serious injuries, and $100 million damage. Tennessee was hardest hit by the storm. Communications and utilities were interrupted for up to ten days.
 1 February 1953 → An intense low pressure system swept across the North Sea. Wind speeds at Aberdeen, Scotland exceeded 125 mph. A storm surge of 13 feet breached dams in the Netherlands, flooding 4 million acres, or one-sixth of the country.
 1 February 1972 → A blizzard in Iran ended a four year drought, but a full week of cold and snow caused the deaths of approximately 4,000 people.
 1 February 2011 → An immense blizzard dropped as much as two feet of snow from Tulsa through southwest Missouri, northeast Missouri, central Illinois, northern Illinois, southeastern Wisconsin, to Lower Michigan. The northern suburbs of Chicago received 21 inches, and the Chicago lakefront recorded 70 mph winds!

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January 15, 1982:

On this day in 1982, up to four inches of snow and powerful northwest winds of 35 to 45 mph with gusts to 60 mph created blizzard conditions with widespread drifting across much of South Dakota and Minnesota from the early morning of the 15th to mid afternoon on the 16th. Wind chills were lowered to 50 to 80 degrees below zero and visibilities were near zero across most of the area. One death was attributed to exposure with the death of a 75 year old Milbank man. There were numerous weather related accidents. Some of the major accidents included: a truck blown off Interstate 90 near Murdo injuring the driver; a truck blown off Highway 281 and turned upside down in a ditch, and a truck slamming into a bridge on Interstate 90 near Murdo. The extreme cold killed numerous fruit trees at a nursery in Watertown.

January 15, 1985:

Heavy snow fell in central and south central South Dakota from early evening of the 15th to around noon on the 16th with areas around Pierre receiving up to 18 inches. Generally 5 to 10 inches fell with numerous minor traffic accidents reported. Interstate 90 had a no travel advisory in a 95-mile stretch from Kimball to Murdo until the afternoon of the 16th due to low visibility and heavy drifting. Also, many schools and businesses were closed. Some snowfall amounts included, 4 inches at Kennebec, 6 inches at Murdo, and 10 inches at Pierre.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 48 (1942) Aberdeen: -42 (2009)
Kennebec: 60 (2006) Kennebec: -30 (2009)
Mobridge: 51 (1942) Mobridge: -33 (2009)
Pierre: 54 (2006) Pierre: -27 (1972)
Sisseton: 47 (1990) Sisseton: -31 (2009)
Timber Lake: 51 (1942) Timber Lake: -32 (1972)
Watertown: 46 (1919) Watertown: -35 (1972)
Wheaton: 43 (1931) Wheaton: -32 (1917)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.30" (1953) Aberdeen: 3.5" (1953)
Kennebec: 0.31" (2003) Kennebec: 5.5" (2003)
Mobridge: 0.60" (1915) Mobridge: 6.0" (1915)
Pierre: 0.91" (1985) Pierre: 10.0" (2003)
Sisseton: 0.38" (1980) Sisseton: 3.0" (1953)
Timber Lake: 0.55" (1943) Timber Lake: 3.3" (1949)
Watertown: 0.45" (1956) Watertown: 6.0" (1909)
Wheaton: 0.68" (1953) Wheaton: 5.0" (1980)


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