This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 28 July 1945 → A B-25 bomber crashed into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building due to reduced visibility from thick fog. Three people on the plane and 11 people in the building were killed. A million dollars damage was done though the building's integrity was not compromised.
 28 July 1952 → A severe storm with hail up to an inch and a half in diameter broke windows, ruined roofs, and stripped trees of leaves near Benson, AZ. The temperature dropped to 37 degrees, and hail was three to four inches deep with drifts 46 inches high.
 28 July 1997 → Fort Collins, CO was inundated by a flood that sent a 20-foot wall of water rushing through the city. Five people died.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


January 17, 1996:

Two to as much as fifteen inches of snow, high winds from 40 to 60 mph, and cold arctic air resulted in blizzard conditions and extreme wind chills from 40 below to 70 below for central, north central, and northeast South Dakota as well as west central Minnesota from the middle morning of the 17th to the early evening of the 18th. Most schools, federal, state, and county offices were closed. Also, various activities were canceled. Travel was extremely difficult due to the near zero visibility with some vehicles stranded. Highway 12 from Webster to the Minnesota border and Interstate-29 was closed on the 18th. Hundreds of people were stranded with some people stranded in their vehicles. Some pheasants and wildlife were lost due to the snow packed so hard they could not dig out. Some snowfall amounts included, 2 inches at Highmore, 3 inches at Pierre and 9NE Reliance, 5 inches at Mobridge, Presho, Roscoe, 10SE Stephan, and Ree Heights, 6 inches at Tulare, 7 inches 12W Tulare and 5E 3S Faulkton, 8 inches 11E 2S Hosmer and at Doland, 9 inches at Mellette, Aberdeen, and Redfield. and 10 inches at Eureka and Britton, and 12 inches at Wilmot, Rosholt, and Ortonville, Minnesota. Fifteen inches occurred at Wheaton, Clinton, and Graceville. The extreme wind chills along with some blowing snow continued across central and north central South Dakota into the early evening of the 18th.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 48 (1947) Aberdeen: -32 (1997)
Kennebec: 62 (1923) Kennebec: -26 (1930)
Mobridge: 51 (1951) Mobridge: -37 (1943)
Pierre: 56 (1934) Pierre: -22 (1943)
Sisseton: 47 (1973) Sisseton: -27 (1943)
Timber Lake: 56 (1974) Timber Lake: -39 (1943)
Watertown: 46 (1913) Watertown: -33 (1943)
Wheaton: 44 (1988) Wheaton: -27 (1954)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.60" (1897) Aberdeen: 6.4" (1996)
Kennebec: 0.27" (1936) Kennebec: 9.0" (1996)
Mobridge: 0.35" (1913) Mobridge: 4.1" (1969)
Pierre: 0.31" (1996) Pierre: 3.5" (1936)
Sisseton: 0.50" (1932) Sisseton: 5.0" (1932)
Timber Lake: 0.62" (1996) Timber Lake: 7.0" (1996)
Watertown: 0.28" (1995) Watertown: 4.0" (1939)
Wheaton: 0.41" (1995) Wheaton: 5.0" (1995)


USA.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal to all federal, state and local government web resources and services.