This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 21 December 1944 → The Battle of the Bulge lasted from December 16, 1944 to January 25, 1945. By this time Germany was clearly losing World War II and Hitler was hoping to regain advantage if the attack would occur in bad weather to prevent the Allied Air Forces from being effective. As the Americans occupied the strategic position of Bastogne, the German army surrounded the city. However because of bad weather, planes were unable to fly and provide supplies by air drop to the American Forces. On December 29 the weather finally cleared up and much needed supplies were received. The Americans then launched a counteroffensive, but soldiers had to fight the cold and snow as well.
 21 December 1967 → The City Hall and a large portion of the business district of Potosi, MO was destroyed by an F4 tornado. There were 52 injuries and 3 deaths.

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January 29, 1971:

Strong winds, combined with 2 to 4 inches of snow added to the heavy snow cover, caused blizzard conditions across the area. Wind gusts of 45 to 55 mph were reported. Several roads were blocked and schools closed for the day. Wind chills of 30 to 45 below also occurred. The storm occurred from noon of the 29th until the early morning of the 30th.

January 29, 2008:

Arctic air combined with strong northwest winds of 20 to 40 mph to bring extreme wind chills to much of north central and northeast South Dakota. The extreme wind chills began in the morning hours of January 29th across all of the area. The wind chills improved across north central South Dakota by the evening and improved across northeast South Dakota during the morning hours of January 30th. The extreme wind chills ranged from 35 to 50 degrees below zero across the area. The extreme cold caused school delays and activity cancellations along with much discomfort to people and livestock. On Monday January 28th, the day before the extreme cold, a southerly flow brought very mild temperatures with some record highs set at several locations. Highs were in the 40s to the mid 50s across central and northeast South Dakota. When the Arctic front came through on January 28th, temperatures fell dramatically through the evening and early morning with below zero temperatures by Tuesday morning, January 29th. In fact, most locations across the area had a 40 to 55 degree temperature change from the 28th to the 29th.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 58 (1931) Aberdeen: -32 (1951)
Kennebec: 65 (1931) Kennebec: -31 (1966)
Mobridge: 61 (1931) Mobridge: -36 (1929)
Pierre: 54 (1992) Pierre: -33 (1966)
Sisseton: 51 (1992) Sisseton: -34 (1951)
Timber Lake: 57 (1931) Timber Lake: -36 (1966)
Watertown: 56 (1931) Watertown: -31 (1951)
Wheaton: 54 (1931) Wheaton: -32 (1951)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.40" (1922) Aberdeen: 4.0" (1922)
Kennebec: 0.30" (2001) Kennebec: 5.0" (2001)
Mobridge: 0.30" (1916) Mobridge: 3.5" (2004)
Pierre: 0.98" (2001) Pierre: 5.0" (2001)
Sisseton: 0.85" (2001) Sisseton: 5.5" (2001)
Timber Lake: 0.14" (1969) Timber Lake: 2.4" (2004)
Watertown: 0.56" (1916) Watertown: 10.0" (1916)
Wheaton: 0.46" (1975) Wheaton: 5.5" (1916)


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