This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 25 July 1956 → In a dense fog bank off Nantucket Island, the Italian passenger ship Andrea Doria collided with the Swedish liner Stockholm at full speed. Eleven hours later the Andrea Doria sank. However, 1660 were rescued and only 51 were lost.
 25 July 1988 → A storm system brought heavy rains to Tasmania, Australia. Coastal areas were flooded by high tides and storm surge.
 25 July 2003 → Lightning struck a home during an overnight thunderstorm southwest of Oslo, Norway. The charge moved into the bedroom and through an iron bed, with a Norwegian couple sleeping in it. The couple was unharmed, but the lightning strike caused the room to flash "like 10 welder's torches" and burned out all of the electrical sockets.
 25 July 2006 → Through today, a two week long heat wave in California killed 140 people.
 25 July 2007 → Canada's highest humidex (roughly analogous to the U.S.'s heat index) reading of 127F at Carman, Manitoba.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


July 3, 1959:

An estimated F2 tornado moved northeast after destroying a farm building at the western edge of Java. Elsewhere in the area, high straight line winds caused property damage while hail damaged crops. The largest hail was 2.75 inches in diameter and was observed 9 miles NNW of Timber Lake.

July 3, 1983:

An F4 tornado occurred west of the town center of Andover, Minnesota, and went through the Red Oaks subdivision. Numerous homes received major damage with some homes having only the foundation left. Although damage was extensive, there were only four minor injuries, mainly from falling debris and broken glass. The tornado moved east and the width covered half a city block.

July 3, 2003:

A supercell thunderstorm moved southeastward across western Jackson County and Bennett County. The storm dropped up to golf ball sized hail and produced an F2 tornado north of Tuthill in Bennett County. The tornado touched down about a mile north of the junction of highways 18 and 73, where it destroyed a garage. The tornado moved south-southeast and destroyed a mobile home just to the southeast of the highway intersection and then dissipated just north of Tuthill. No one was injured. Also on this day, a line of severe thunderstorms with hail up to the size of golf balls and winds over 80 mph at times brought widespread property and crop damage to far northeast Brown, across Marshall and Roberts counties. The wind and hail caused the most damage to crops in a 20 mile to 70 mile long area from north of Britton over to Sisseton and into west central Minnesota. Much of the crops were shredded to the ground. In fact, approximately 30 percent (70,000 acres) of Marshall County’s 227,000 acres of crops were damaged or destroyed. Cities receiving the most damage from the line of storms were, Hecla, Andover, Britton, Kidder, Veblen, Roslyn, Langford, Lake City, Claire City, Sisseton, Waubay, Rosholt, and Wilmot. Storm damage mostly included, trees and branches down, power lines and poles down, roof and siding damage from hail and fallen trees, some farm outbuildings damaged or destroyed, and many windows broke out of homes and vehicles. Also, many boats, docks, and campers received some damage in the path of the storms. Specifically, an aerial crop spraying plane at the Sisseton airport was picked up and thrown 450 feet and landed upside down. In Claire City, a 55,000 bushel grain bin was blown off of its foundation and flattened. On a farm five miles north of Amherst, three large grain bins were blown over and damaged.

July 3, 2003:

Severe thunderstorms brought damaging winds to parts of central South Dakota, especially to Lyman County. Eighty mph winds moved a building off the foundation at the Presho Municipal Airport. Eighty mph winds also destroyed or damaged many grain bins and caused damage to several other buildings in and around Presho. A large sign, twenty power poles, along with many trees were downed in Presho. There were also several broken house and car windows from hail and high winds. Seventy mph winds tore a garage door loose, bent a flagpole over, and downed many large tree branches in Kennebec. The winds also caused some damage to homes, sheds, and grain bins in Kennebec.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 107 (1949) Aberdeen: 39 (1917)
Kennebec: 108 (1949) Kennebec: 36 (1917)
Mobridge: 110 (1949) Mobridge: 42 (1967)
Pierre: 110 (1949) Pierre: 43 (1967)
Sisseton: 105 (1949) Sisseton: 45 (1969)
Timber Lake: 110 (1949) Timber Lake: 40 (1967)
Watertown: 100 (1929) Watertown: 35 (1917)
Wheaton: 98 (1949) Wheaton: 39 (1972)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.84" (2010)
Kennebec: 2.40" (1974)
Mobridge: 2.04" (1980)
Pierre: 1.53" (1905)
Sisseton: 3.17" (1905)
Timber Lake: 3.05" (1995)
Watertown: 3.40" (1905)
Wheaton: 2.13" (1921)


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