This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 20 September 1845 → The "Great Adirondack Tornado," really a family of up to 4 tornadoes, traversed an incredible 275 miles, tearing down many thousands of trees across northern New York and northern Vermont. The damage path from the tornadoes and associated downburst winds was up to a mile and a half wide. Hailstones were as big as hens' eggs.
 20 September 1987 → A vivid rainbow was seen at Fort Simpson, in the Northwest Territories of Canada, during a visit by Pope John Paul II.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


July 6, 1963:

A farmer was fatally injured near Waubay when the barn was destroyed while he was inside. Winds of 110 mph were recorded at FAA in Watertown before the roof and wind instruments were blown away.

July 6, 1982:

A severe thunderstorm produced a series of five microbursts over Sioux Falls. The microbursts caused extensive damage. Winds were estimated to have reached 125 mph, and a peak gust of 82 mph was recorded by the airport. Damage, which was heaviest in the south central and northeast sections of the city, included thousands of trees uprooted or damaged. Several semi trailers were blown over, critically injuring one man and slightly injuring two others. Several other minor injuries occurred mainly from flying glass. Five cars were rolled over by the high winds and several others damaged flying debris. Damage at the airport included a portion of a hangar roof blown off and three light aircraft flipped over.

July 6, 1994:

Widespread rainfall of over 6 inches fell in Dewey, Potter, and Faulk Counties, causing damage to roads and flooded basements and fields. A teenage girl escaped injury when her car was washed away by the waters of a swollen creek about 5 miles east of Gettysburg. Some storm total amounts include; 6.80 inches in Orient; 6.70 at Faulkton; 5.80 in Milbank; 5.48 in Big Stone City; 5.02 in Ipswich; 4.50 in Gettysburg; 4.17 in Webster; 4.12 near Onaka; 4.02 in Leola; and 3.97 in Britton.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 115 (1936) Aberdeen: 42 (1942)
Kennebec: 111 (1937) Kennebec: 40 (1899)
Mobridge: 114 (1936) Mobridge: 42 (1915)
Pierre: 111 (1973) Pierre: 47 (1934)
Sisseton: 113 (1936) Sisseton: 45 (1997)
Timber Lake: 115 (1936) Timber Lake: 45 (1958)
Watertown: 104 (1936) Watertown: 40 (1942)
Wheaton: 104 (1988) Wheaton: 47 (1984)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.26" (1994)
Kennebec: 1.43" (1907)
Mobridge: 1.85" (1994)
Pierre: 1.84" (1994)
Sisseton: 2.25" (1938)
Timber Lake: 1.28" (1994)
Watertown: 0.95" (1956)
Wheaton: 1.65" (2004)


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