This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 3 March 1876 → The Kentucky Meat Shower. Around 2pm, chunks of fresh, red meat fell from the sky for several minutes onto Olympia Springs in Bath County. The chunks of meat were 3 to 4 inches square. Two local men tasted it and figured it to be mutton or venison. Scientific analysis showed it to be lung tissue, muscle tissue, and cartilage, likely from a horse. It was posited that a flock of buzzards had just eaten a dead horse nearby, and then disgorged their meal onto unsuspecting Olympia Springs. The day was otherwise pleasant with blue skies, a light breeze, and temperatures in the 40s.
 3 March 1966 → Jackson, MS was heavily damaged by a half-mile wide F5 tornado. Of the total death toll of 57, twelve people were killed when the Candlestick Shopping Center was leveled to the ground.
 3 March 1989 → A massive dust storm lowered visibility to zero along I-10 in Cochise County, AZ. Chain-reaction accidents involved 25 cars. Two motorists were killed.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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July 8, 1680:

The first confirmed true tornado in the United States touched down at Cambridge, Massachusetts. The funnel was filled with, stones, bushes, and other things. The tornado also unroofed a barn and snapped many large trees.

July 8, 1922:

Two tornadoes occurred near the southern border of South Dakota, with one at St. Charles in Gregory County, and the other on the southern shore of Lake Andes, in Charles Mix County. The distance apart was about 30 miles. The tornado in Gregory County missed the town of Lake Andes, however it destroyed about 29 cottages and 5 large barns. Fifteen people were injured, but no one was killed.

July 8, 1951:

An F2 touched down in open country and moved northeastward, passing three miles northwest of Corona in Roberts County. Thirteen buildings were destroyed on a farm with only the house left standing. Three cows and 20 pigs were killed.

July 8, 2011:

Historic releases on the Oahe Dam of 160,000 CFS kept the Missouri River from Pierre to Chamberlain at record flood levels throughout July. Extensive sandbagging and levee building had been done earlier to hold back the river. Residents in the Pierre, Fort Pierre, and Oacoma areas continued to be the most affected by the river. Many homes along with roads, crop and pastureland remained flooded throughout the month. The Missouri River at Pierre remained from 5 to 6 foot above flood stage throughout July. The Missouri River at Chamberlain reached a record stage of 75.1 feet on July 8th. Flood stage at Chamberlain is 65 feet. The flooding on the river began in late May and continued into August.

July 8, 2013:

A thunderstorm complex moving across central and north central South Dakota produced gusty winds up to 70 mph. These strong winds brought down several tree branches around the area with Dewey County the hardest hit location. In Timber Lake, downed tree branches fell on houses and vehicles causing damage.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 106 (1936) Aberdeen: 43 (1905)
Kennebec: 109 (1989) Kennebec: 42 (1952)
Mobridge: 108 (1936) Mobridge: 46 (1953)
Pierre: 110 (1989) Pierre: 48 (1953)
Sisseton: 105 (1936) Sisseton: 44 (1953)
Timber Lake: 112 (1936) Timber Lake: 44 (1944)
Watertown: 98 (1936) Watertown: 40 (1899)
Wheaton: 100 (1974) Wheaton: 45 (1922)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.25" (1999)
Kennebec: 0.95" (1978)
Mobridge: 1.41" (2003)
Pierre: 2.43" (1950)
Sisseton: 1.67" (1949)
Timber Lake: 1.34" (1915)
Watertown: 0.82" (1964)
Wheaton: 4.90" (1950)


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