This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 31 October 1991 → A severe winter storm dubbed the Great Halloween Mega Storm struck the upper Midwest. Minnesota bore the brunt of the storm. Blizzard conditions occurred with wind gusts frequently to 50 mph. By the time the storm finally ended on November 2, Duluth received 37 inches of snow, Minneapolis 28 inches, and International Falls 18 inches. For Duluth and Minneapolis, this set new all time records for single storm totals. These two cities received nearly half their normal seasonal snows in this one storm.
 31 October 1994 → American Eagle Flight 4184 was completing its last turn in holding before being cleared for landing at O'Hare Airport in Chicago. After holding in pattern for an hour in wintry precipitation, enough ice accumulated on the aircraft that the plane became uncontrollable and crashed in Roselawn, IN. All 68 on board the ATR-72-212 aircraft were killed.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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July 8, 1680:

The first confirmed true tornado in the United States touched down at Cambridge, Massachusetts. The funnel was filled with, stones, bushes, and other things. The tornado also unroofed a barn and snapped many large trees.

July 8, 1922:

Two tornadoes occurred near the southern border of South Dakota, with one at St. Charles in Gregory County, and the other on the southern shore of Lake Andes, in Charles Mix County. The distance apart was about 30 miles. The tornado in Gregory County missed the town of Lake Andes, however it destroyed about 29 cottages and 5 large barns. Fifteen people were injured, but no one was killed.

July 8, 1951:

An F2 touched down in open country and moved northeastward, passing three miles northwest of Corona in Roberts County. Thirteen buildings were destroyed on a farm with only the house left standing. Three cows and 20 pigs were killed.

July 8, 2011:

Historic releases on the Oahe Dam of 160,000 CFS kept the Missouri River from Pierre to Chamberlain at record flood levels throughout July. Extensive sandbagging and levee building had been done earlier to hold back the river. Residents in the Pierre, Fort Pierre, and Oacoma areas continued to be the most affected by the river. Many homes along with roads, crop and pastureland remained flooded throughout the month. The Missouri River at Pierre remained from 5 to 6 foot above flood stage throughout July. The Missouri River at Chamberlain reached a record stage of 75.1 feet on July 8th. Flood stage at Chamberlain is 65 feet. The flooding on the river began in late May and continued into August.

July 8, 2013:

A thunderstorm complex moving across central and north central South Dakota produced gusty winds up to 70 mph. These strong winds brought down several tree branches around the area with Dewey County the hardest hit location. In Timber Lake, downed tree branches fell on houses and vehicles causing damage.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 106 (1936) Aberdeen: 43 (1905)
Kennebec: 109 (1989) Kennebec: 42 (1952)
Mobridge: 108 (1936) Mobridge: 46 (1953)
Pierre: 110 (1989) Pierre: 48 (1953)
Sisseton: 105 (1936) Sisseton: 44 (1953)
Timber Lake: 112 (1936) Timber Lake: 44 (1944)
Watertown: 98 (1936) Watertown: 40 (1899)
Wheaton: 100 (1974) Wheaton: 45 (1922)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.25" (1999)
Kennebec: 0.95" (1978)
Mobridge: 1.41" (2003)
Pierre: 2.43" (1950)
Sisseton: 1.67" (1949)
Timber Lake: 1.34" (1915)
Watertown: 0.82" (1964)
Wheaton: 4.90" (1950)


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