This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 22 September 1810 → Fernhill Heath, England, was struck by what was probably Europe's widest tornado, with some reports saying the twister was nearly a mile across. Modern analysis suggests it was an EF4.
 22 September 1869Cleveland Abbe began forecasting weather in Cincinnati. Professor Abbe was one of the nation's pioneer weather forecasters and observers.
 22 September 1989Hurricane Hugo made landfall in the Carolinas with winds up to 140 mph. Hugo caused $7 billion in damage in the United States and $3 billion in the Caribbean. All together, the death toll was 76.
 22 September 1998Hurricane Georges raked Hispanola after reaching category 4 status, leaving 580 dead in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, due mainly to flash flooding and subsequent mud slides in high terrain regions. Damage estimates from the storm exceeded $1 billion (US). Vivid lightning and possible blue jets, a type of rare upward lightning, were reported as the eye passed over the mountains of Hispanola.

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July 11, 1909:

A deadly, estimated F2 tornado moved ESE across the Simpson Park section of Big Stone City in South Dakota. A bus was thrown from the road and the driver was killed. Two homes and several barns were destroyed. As the tornado crossed the foot of Big Stone Lake, it tore apart a railroad yard and killed four of the 26 Armemian laborers who were living in box cars at Ortonville, Minnesota. Nineteen were injured.

July 11, 1981:

Severe thunderstorms moved eastward across the entire length of the South Dakota along the northern portion of the state. Hail, with the largest up to nine inches in circumference, resulted in 100 percent crop loss, damage to numerous buildings and loss of livestock. Trees were stripped and large limbs broken. High winds also accompanied these storms. Crop and property damage was so extensive, total cost of damage was not estimated. Storms lasted into the early morning hours on the 12. Thunderhawk in Corson County had estimated winds of 70 to 75 mph that destroyed a machine shop and seven metal grain storage bins. In and around Pollock, a silo was moved three off the foundation. Power and telephones lines were down. Rainfall measured 2.28 inches in two hours in Pollock.

July 11, 1990:

The most costly hailstorm in U.S. history battered many parts of the Front Range of Colorado from near Estes Park to Colorado Springs. The hailstorm, which was accompanied at times by torrential rains and high winds, produced a swath of damage generally 5 to 10 miles wide. One of the hardest hit areas included parts of the Denver metropolitan region. Total property damage with listed at $505 million dollars, which is considered a low estimate.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 110 (1930) Aberdeen: 45 (1941)
Kennebec: 113 (1894) Kennebec: 41 (1922)
Mobridge: 108 (1936) Mobridge: 47 (1951)
Pierre: 111 (1973) Pierre: 47 (1993)
Sisseton: 108 (1936) Sisseton: 48 (1951)
Timber Lake: 110 (1936) Timber Lake: 45 (1993)
Watertown: 104 (1930) Watertown: 44 (1922)
Wheaton: 105 (1966) Wheaton: 47 (1932)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.95" (2000)
Kennebec: 0.71" (1916)
Mobridge: 3.66" (1997)
Pierre: 1.50" (1992)
Sisseton: 2.00" (1912)
Timber Lake: 2.15" (1989)
Watertown: 1.26" (1966)
Wheaton: 1.97" (1948)


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