This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 18 December 1944 → The ships of the US Navy Task Force 38, seven fleet and six light carriers, eight battleships, 15 cruisers, and about 50 destroyers were operating about 300 miles east of Luzon in the Philippine Sea. A small but violent typhoon overtook the task force with relatively little warning. Many of the ships were caught near the center of the storm and buffeted by extreme seas and hurricane force winds. Three destroyers capsized and went down with practically all hands, while a cruiser, five aircraft carriers, and three destroyers suffered serious damage. Approximately 790 men were lost or killed. Fires occurred in three carriers when planes broke loose in their hangars and 146 planes on various ships were lost or damaged beyond economical repair by fires, impact damage, or by being swept overboard.
 18 December 1957 → An unusually late tornado outbreak for the time of year for so far north struck Missouri and Illinois. 18 tornadoes were rated F2 or greater. An F4 ripped through Jackson, Williamson, and Franklin counties in Illinois. Murphysboro was hard hit with 10 people killed. Sunfield, IL vanished completely as an F5 tornado swept it clean.

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July 11, 1909:

A deadly, estimated F2 tornado moved ESE across the Simpson Park section of Big Stone City in South Dakota. A bus was thrown from the road and the driver was killed. Two homes and several barns were destroyed. As the tornado crossed the foot of Big Stone Lake, it tore apart a railroad yard and killed four of the 26 Armemian laborers who were living in box cars at Ortonville, Minnesota. Nineteen were injured.

July 11, 1981:

Severe thunderstorms moved eastward across the entire length of the South Dakota along the northern portion of the state. Hail, with the largest up to nine inches in circumference, resulted in 100 percent crop loss, damage to numerous buildings and loss of livestock. Trees were stripped and large limbs broken. High winds also accompanied these storms. Crop and property damage was so extensive, total cost of damage was not estimated. Storms lasted into the early morning hours on the 12. Thunderhawk in Corson County had estimated winds of 70 to 75 mph that destroyed a machine shop and seven metal grain storage bins. In and around Pollock, a silo was moved three off the foundation. Power and telephones lines were down. Rainfall measured 2.28 inches in two hours in Pollock.

July 11, 1990:

The most costly hailstorm in U.S. history battered many parts of the Front Range of Colorado from near Estes Park to Colorado Springs. The hailstorm, which was accompanied at times by torrential rains and high winds, produced a swath of damage generally 5 to 10 miles wide. One of the hardest hit areas included parts of the Denver metropolitan region. Total property damage with listed at $505 million dollars, which is considered a low estimate.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 110 (1930) Aberdeen: 45 (1941)
Kennebec: 113 (1894) Kennebec: 41 (1922)
Mobridge: 108 (1936) Mobridge: 47 (1951)
Pierre: 111 (1973) Pierre: 47 (1993)
Sisseton: 108 (1936) Sisseton: 48 (1951)
Timber Lake: 110 (1936) Timber Lake: 45 (1993)
Watertown: 104 (1930) Watertown: 44 (1922)
Wheaton: 105 (1966) Wheaton: 47 (1932)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.95" (2000)
Kennebec: 0.71" (1916)
Mobridge: 3.66" (1997)
Pierre: 1.50" (1992)
Sisseton: 2.00" (1912)
Timber Lake: 2.15" (1989)
Watertown: 1.26" (1966)
Wheaton: 1.97" (1948)


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