This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 1 March 1980 → An unusually large Florida tornado, an F3, was at times more than 500 yards wide. It struck near Fort Lauderdale and traveled 7 miles. The tornado killed one person and caused $6 million in damage.
 1 March 1983 → An F2 tornado stayed on the ground for three and a half miles as it moved through south central Los Angeles, CA. Fifty buildings were damaged and 30 people were injured, mostly by flying glass.
 1 March 2003 → Officials in charge of the Iditarod Trail Dog Sled Race in Alaska were forced to change the route of their famous race because of unusually warm conditions and a lack of snow.
 1 March 2007 → The first tornado of a large outbreak struck Enterprise, AL around 1pm. Eight students died when the EF-4 struck the town's high school, and there was an additional fatality as the tornado tore through the city.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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July 18, 1883:

An estimated F3 tornado moved southeast from 3 miles south of Redfield to north of Hitchcock, to 6 miles southeast of Crandon. At least one farm house was destroyed and swept away. Three people were killed on one farm.

July 18, 1983:

In the afternoon, an F2 tornado that touched down in the northern suburbs of Minneapolis became one of the most observed and photographed tornadoes ever. The photographic coverage included video from a Minnesota DOT traffic camera and a remarkable aerial video taken from a helicopter by a television camera crew. The tornado began in Brooklyn Park and moved slowly northeast, causing light to moderate damage. It then turned east and slowed as it crossed the Mississippi River. Also on this day, an F2 tornado touched down two mile southeast of Bryant, in Hamlin County. This tornado traveled near Dolph Creek, and moved east along the creek to the Lake Norden area. The tornado damaged many trees and destroyed a barn. A second F2 tornado touched down three miles west of Toronto and moved southeast. The tornado destroyed a barn, silo, and six other buildings and caused extensive damage to farm equipment on a farm one mile south and a half mile west Astoria.

July 18, 1986:

In the afternoon, an F2 tornado that touched down in the northern suburbs of Minneapolis became one of the most observed and photographed tornadoes ever. The photographic coverage included video from a Minnesota DOT traffic camera and a remarkable aerial video taken from a helicopter by a television camera crew. The tornado began in Brooklyn Park and moved slowly northeast, causing light to moderate damage. It then turned east and slowed as it crossed the Mississippi River. Also on this day, an F2 tornado touched down two mile southeast of Bryant, in Hamlin County. This tornado traveled near Dolph Creek, and moved east along the creek to the Lake Norden area. The tornado damaged many trees and destroyed a barn. A second F2 tornado touched down three miles west of Toronto and moved southeast. The tornado destroyed a barn, silo, and six other buildings and caused extensive damage to farm equipment on a farm one mile south and a half mile west Astoria

July 18, 2008:

Severe thunderstorms developed across parts of central and north central South Dakota bringing large hail up to the size of golf balls and damaging winds to near 80 mph. Some tree, vehicle, and building damage occurred with some of the storms. Eighty mph winds or higher brought down many branches along with some trees in Fort Pierre. Power was cut off for parts of Fort Pierre when branches fell on power lines. Several truck trailers and feed silos were tipped onto their sides by the high winds. Also some buildings were damaged. A loaded train was pushed down the tracks almost a quarter of a mile by the high winds. Seventy mph winds or higher brought down many tree branches along with some trees in Pierre. There were power outages in Pierre along with some buildings receiving damage. Damaging thunderstorm winds also downed six power poles between Sully Buttes and Onida knocking power out to over 800 homes in and around Onida.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 106 (1936) Aberdeen: 40 (1915)
Kennebec: 110 (1926) Kennebec: 44 (1922)
Mobridge: 109 (1934) Mobridge: 46 (1912)
Pierre: 109 (1998) Pierre: 49 (2009)
Sisseton: 105 (1932) Sisseton: 47 (2009)
Timber Lake: 106 (1977) Timber Lake: 44 (2009)
Watertown: 105 (1940) Watertown: 45 (1914)
Wheaton: 102 (1932) Wheaton: 46 (1922)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 2.46" (1983)
Kennebec: 1.24" (1924)
Mobridge: 2.45" (1946)
Pierre: 1.03" (2008)
Sisseton: 3.00" (1946)
Timber Lake: 3.00" (2008)
Watertown: 1.28" (1989)
Wheaton: 1.54" (1989)


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