This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 22 July 1890 → An F4 tornado near Taunton, MN leveled houses and carried chickens for over two miles.
 22 July 1918 → A single bolt of lightning struck 504 sheep dead in their tracks in the Wasatch National Forest in Utah. Sheep often herd together in storms, and as a result the shock from the lightning bolt was passed from one animal to another.
 22 July 1993 → During the Great Flood of 1993, levees near Kaskaskia, IL ruptured, forcing the entire town to evacuate by barges operated by the Army Corps of Engineers.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


July 23, 1985:

In a half hour, 1.42 inches of rain fell in Pierre, resulting in flash flooding. Streets were awash and some businesses had water damage.

July 23, 1986:

Thunderstorm winds gusted to 60 mph on the Roberts and Marshall County line, southeast of Veblen. The central portion of Roberts County had up to 1.75 inches in diameter hail fall. Heavy rain of up to seven inches fell at Sica Hollow State Park, causing extensive lowland flooding in the area. Highway 10, west of Sisseton was under water for several miles. The Sisseton city park was also completely under water.

July 23, 2007:

High heat indices along with very little wind contributed to the deaths of over 2800 cattle in Brown, Spink, Day, and Marshall Counties. Most of the cattle deaths occurred on July 23rd. The high heat indices continued through the 25th with some more cattle deaths but protective measures kept the death count down. Most of the cattle that died were on feedlots. The total loss was around 3 million dollars.

July 23, 2010:

A United States record setting hailstone fell from a very strong supercell thunderstorm moving southeast across central South Dakota. The record setting hailstone fell near Vivian, South Dakota and measured 8 inches in diameter, 18.625 inches in circumference, and weighed 1.9375 pounds. This hailstone broke the previous United States record for diameter (7.0 inches - 22 June 2003 in Aurora, NE) and weight (1.67 pounds - 3 September 1970 in Coffeyville, KS). The Aurora, Nebraska hailstone will retain the record for circumference (18.75 inches). Several other stones of 6 inches or more in diameter were measured during the storm survey. Along with the very large hail, damaging winds in excess of 70 mph along with an isolated tornado occurred. The large hail and high winds caused extensive damage to homes, outbuildings, and vehicles as it moved southeast across the region. Some of the hail went completely through car windshields, roofs, garages, and campers. The hail caused five minor injuries to motorists on Interstate 90 as it went through their windshields. A minor was severely injured when the glass in the mini-van he was traveling was completely shattered by the large hail. The child suffered numerous cuts, many requiring stitches.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 109 (1941) Aberdeen: 41 (1904)
Kennebec: 113 (1940) Kennebec: 45 (1954)
Mobridge: 108 (1940) Mobridge: 46 (1952)
Pierre: 115 (1940) Pierre: 49 (2004)
Sisseton: 101 (1934) Sisseton: 43 (1992)
Timber Lake: 107 (1949) Timber Lake: 40 (1913)
Watertown: 106 (1934) Watertown: 43 (1904)
Wheaton: 99 (1988) Wheaton: 46 (1992)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.42" (1988)
Kennebec: 0.91" (1970)
Mobridge: 0.64" (1949)
Pierre: 2.04" (1997)
Sisseton: 2.70" (1912)
Timber Lake: 1.40" (1927)
Watertown: 1.58" (2011)
Wheaton: 1.10" (1975)


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