This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 27 November 1701 → Anders Celsius, the astronomer who invented the Celsius thermometer scale, was born in Uppsala, Sweden.
 27 November 1703 → The Great Storm of 1703 devastated southern England. Though strong gales buffeted the region from November 24 through December 2, the storm hit its peak on the morning of November 27. Winds to 120 mph blew down chimneys and church steeples, destroyed buildings, and felled countless thousands of trees. Four hundred windmills were shattered.
 27 November 1898 → The SS Portland passenger ship gave the name to the "Portland Gale" after the storm sunk the ship off the coast of Cape Cod, killing all 200 people aboard.
 27 November 1912 → Snow fell across northern Florida, marking one of the few times it has ever snowed there in November.

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July 24, 1993:

A severe thunderstorm struck southern Hyde County, including the city of Highmore, with winds in excess of 60 mph and heavy rains of two to four inches. Near Stephan, in far southern Hyde County, an estimated of over four inches of rain in 20 minutes caused flooding damage around a bridge. Three to nine inches of rain caused widespread flash flooding and flood damage to Day, Roberts, and southeastern Marshall Counties. Especially hard hit was an area from Webster, northeastward through the Pickerell and Buffalo Lakes area, to Sisseton. A state of emergency was declared in Sisseton. The heavy rains overwhelmed a small creek that flows through Sisseton, swelling it to three blocks wide and up to five feet deep. The rushing water carried lumber, railroad ties, propane tanks, and several vehicles. Flood damage occurred to 70 percent of all buildings in Sisseton, including 100 homes. In Webster, the excessive rain flooded all the sewer lefts that pump water out of low lying areas in town. The sewer system then backed up into homes and businesses. Nine of the 12 main floor rooms at the Super 8 motel in Webster were flooded by the rainstorm. Roads and bridge damage was also extensive in Roberts, Day, and Marshall Counties with about 50 roads and bridges in Day County damaged by the flooding. Areas lakes, including Pickerell, Blue Dog, Enemy Swim, and Buffalo lakes rose over two feet, inundating areas around lake homes and submerging docks. Some estimated storm total rainfall amounts include; 4.60 inches in Webster; 3.91 in Waubay; 3.90 in Britton; and 3.60 inches near Ashton.

July 24, 1997:

Over 6 inches of rain fell in the Conde area in far northeast Spink County. Water was over Highway 37 and many town basements were flooded. One basement filled with 5 feet of water. Nearly 7 inches of rain was received at Lake Poinset and over 6 inches of rain was received in Estelline. Hidewood creek in Hamlin County overflowed its banks. Water went into many residences homes and some people were evacuated. A small bridge was taken out by the high water and Highway 28 was closed for an hour.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 108 (1931) Aberdeen: 46 (1905)
Kennebec: 113 (1936) Kennebec: 47 (1911)
Mobridge: 109 (1952) Mobridge: 47 (2004)
Pierre: 112 (1952) Pierre: 53 (2004)
Sisseton: 105 (1940) Sisseton: 47 (1955)
Timber Lake: 106 (1952) Timber Lake: 45 (1933)
Watertown: 109 (1940) Watertown: 44 (1905)
Wheaton: 100 (1932) Wheaton: 53 (2004)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.47" (1957)
Kennebec: 1.65" (1977)
Mobridge: 0.41" (1960)
Pierre: 1.25" (2001)
Sisseton: 2.40" (1986)
Timber Lake: 0.92" (1914)
Watertown: 2.06" (1934)
Wheaton: 1.56" (1979)


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