This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 21 August 1883 → What was likely an F5 tornado devastated the north side of Rochester, MN. The tornado derailed a train and leveled farms. 40 people were killed.
 21 August 1888 → A "grand spectacle" of four waterspouts near Jacobson, MD overturned boats and moved ashore. 15 people were injured. Another tornado moved east-northeast near Still Pond, MD killing 10 people in a cannery. A total of 11 deaths and 40 injuries were reported from this tornado.
 21 August 1918 → Tyler, MN suffered a direct hit by an F4 tornado. Six hundred buildings were damaged or destroyed and 36 lives were taken, including three when the town's hospital was struck.
 21 August 1984 → The State Fair in Pueblo, CO had to be closed during a vicious hailstorm. Nine people were hurt, including one seriously.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


July 29, 1896:

A destructive hailstorm originated in the central part of Edmunds County near Ipswich, passing southeast. This storm destroyed crops and broke glass in many windows along a path to the eastern portions of Spink County.

July 29, 2003:

Winds of 70 mph, to over 100 mph caused a lot of damage in and around Redfield east to Frankfort and south to Tulare. The winds and hail damaged many roofs, crops, outbuildings, downed power lines and poles, and also downed many branches and trees. In Redfield, a trailer home with two occupants, were rolled three to four times over 75 feet. The trailer home rolled over a pickup truck and damaged it. Much of the contents in the trailer home were damaged and the trailer home itself was a total loss. The people inside the home received minor injuries. A garage was also blown apart in Redfield with the car damaged inside. At the grain elevator in Redfield, several vehicle windows were broke out by airborne sand and rocks. A street light was ripped from the concrete in Redfield. East of Redfield, a 70 foot silo of over 70 tons was crumbled to the ground and a large tractor shed was blown apart with damage to the contents. Wind equipment by Redfield measured winds at 106 mph before the power went out.

July 29, 2004:

A record setting flash flood occurred over part of the Greenville, South Carolina, during the morning hours. Six to eight inches of rain fell just east of Berea, a northwestern suburb, which caused the Reedy River through downtown Greenville crested 9 feet above flood stage. This was the highest level since 1908.

July 29, 2006:

Record heat and high humidity affected central, north central, and northeast South Dakota for the end of July. Heat indices rose to 105 to 115 degrees across the area. Record high temperatures were set at Pierre, Mobridge, Kennebec, Timber Lake, and Aberdeen. Pierre rose to 111 degrees on each of the three days. Mobridge rose to 111 degrees on the 28th and to 112 degrees on the 30th. Several record highs of 108 and 109 degrees were set at Timber Lake and Kennebec in the three day period. Aberdeen set a record high of 106 on the 30th.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 109 (1933) Aberdeen: 42 (1899)
Kennebec: 116 (1933) Kennebec: 45 (1925)
Mobridge: 104 (1933) Mobridge: 44 (2004)
Pierre: 111 (2006) Pierre: 47 (1971)
Sisseton: 103 (1975) Sisseton: 40 (1952)
Timber Lake: 110 (1917) Timber Lake: 45 (2004)
Watertown: 107 (1933) Watertown: 44 (1925)
Wheaton: 104 (1917) Wheaton: 45 (1925)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.00" (1950)
Kennebec: 1.43" (1945)
Mobridge: 2.06" (1941)
Pierre: 1.13" (1979)
Sisseton: 2.20" (1989)
Timber Lake: 1.65" (1941)
Watertown: 1.20" (1950)
Wheaton: 1.09" (1989)


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