This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 21 December 1944 → The Battle of the Bulge lasted from December 16, 1944 to January 25, 1945. By this time Germany was clearly losing World War II and Hitler was hoping to regain advantage if the attack would occur in bad weather to prevent the Allied Air Forces from being effective. As the Americans occupied the strategic position of Bastogne, the German army surrounded the city. However because of bad weather, planes were unable to fly and provide supplies by air drop to the American Forces. On December 29 the weather finally cleared up and much needed supplies were received. The Americans then launched a counteroffensive, but soldiers had to fight the cold and snow as well.
 21 December 1967 → The City Hall and a large portion of the business district of Potosi, MO was destroyed by an F4 tornado. There were 52 injuries and 3 deaths.

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June 2, 1891:

An estimated F3 tornado moved northeast, passing one mile south of Hazel, where three people were killed in a barn. The farm home was entirely swept away. A horse was seen being carried in the air for 400 yards. The tornado was estimated to be on the ground for about 5 miles. After touching down, this estimated F2 tornado moved northeast along the eastern edge of Watertown, where a barn was destroyed and debris was scattered for a half mile. Two homes were leveled 5 miles northeast of Watertown. Near Waverly, one person was injured in the destruction of a flour mill. This tornado was estimated to be on the ground for about 15 miles.

June 2, 1964:

Some bitter cold temperatures were observed during the early morning hours on the 2nd. Some low temperatures include; 27 degrees 12 miles SSW of Harrold; 28 degrees in Andover and 23 N of Highmore; 29 degrees 4 NW of Gann Valley, Redfield, and 2 NW of Stephan; 30 degrees in Castlewood and 1 W of Highmore; 31 degrees in Britton, 1 NW of Faulkton, and in Kennebec; and 32 degrees in McLaughlin.

June 2, 2008:

Several supercell thunderstorms rolled southeast from northwest South Dakota into central South Dakota bringing large hail, damaging winds, and flash flooding during the late afternoon and evening hours. The large hail, up to baseball size, and high winds killed a large number of birds, pheasants, grouse, and rabbits. Thousands of acres of grassland and cropland along with countless shelter belts received minor to major damage in Stanley and Hughes County. The large hail also knocked out many windows and damaged the siding of tens of buildings and homes in both Stanley and Hughes counties. Many roads and cropland were also affected by flash flooding throughout Hughes and Stanley counties. Very heavy rain of over 3 inches caused flash flooding in many parts of Pierre into the early morning hours. Many roads were reportedly under 1 to 2 feet of water. Several homes in southeast Pierre received sewer backup. Also several homes on Grey Goose road received flood damage. A Federal Disaster Declaration was issued for Hughes and Stanley counties mainly for the flooding. Tennis ball hail broke most of the west side windows out of the house near Mission Ridge in Stanley County. Hail up to the size of baseballs fell in Pierre breaking some windows out of homes and vehicles. Very heavy rains of 2 to 4 inches fell across much of Stanley County causing extensive flash flooding. Seventeen roads also sustained some form of damage from the flooding. Very heavy rain of over 3 inches caused flash flooding in many parts of Pierre into the early morning hours. Many roads were under 1 to 2 feet of water. Several homes in southeast Pierre received sewer backup. Also several homes on Grey Goose road received flood damage.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 95 (1934) Aberdeen: 30 (1946)
Kennebec: 99 (1940) Kennebec: 28 (1969)
Mobridge: 93 (1911) Mobridge: 32 (1946)
Pierre: 95 (1940) Pierre: 35 (1969)
Sisseton: 105 (1934) Sisseton: 35 (1946)
Timber Lake: 98 (1914) Timber Lake: 31 (1946)
Watertown: 96 (1940) Watertown: 30 (1946)
Wheaton: 94 (1923) Wheaton: 36 (1964)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 0.99" (1939)
Kennebec: 2.23" (1954)
Mobridge: 0.87" (1915)
Pierre: 3.32" (2008)
Sisseton: 1.30" (1951)
Timber Lake: 1.92" (1932)
Watertown: 1.15" (1951)
Wheaton: 7.02" (2007)


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