This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 17 September 1932 → A tropical storm struck the Annapolis Valley in the Canadian Maritimes, destroying 300,000 barrels of apples in Nova Scotia. A second tropical storm would strike Nova Scotia just seven days later.
 17 September 1936 → Tropical storm remnants brought up to 30 inches of rain to central Texas, resulting in massive flooding. In San Angelo the Concho River reached one of its highest stages on record and inundated the city. One thousand homes were damaged or destroyed, two bridges were swept away, and there were 100 rescues performed. Water was six feet deep in the lobby of the Naylor Hotel.
 17 September 1947 → The Fort Lauderdale Hurricane struck the east coast of Florida as a high-end Category 4, resulting in 51 fatalities. Hurricane force winds extended 120 miles out from the center, and produced the highest measured ground wind speeds in a Florida hurricane until Hurricane Andrew. The storm then crossed the Gulf of Mexico and produced 110 mph winds at New Orleans.
 17 September 2004 → Flooding and mudslides killed more than 3,000 people in Haiti in Hurricane Jeanne.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


June 12, 1924:

A tornado moved southeast from the southwestern edge of Lake Kampeska, passing southwest of Watertown. Two barns were destroyed and 20 smaller farm buildings were heavily damaged. This tornado was estimated to have F2 strength.

June 12, 1983:

Lightning struck and killed two cows near Miller. Lightning also struck a home six miles north of Aberdeen, breaking a ceramic statue, and blow out light bulbs. Another home in Aberdeen was struck by lightning, rupturing a gas line and starting the house on fire. Also, heavy rains up to seven inches fall around the area. Some storm total rainfall amounts include; 2.00 inches at 2NW of Stephan; 2.40 inches in Miller; 3.03 at 4 miles west of Mellette; and 6.30 inches in Orient.

June 12, 1994:

In Hand County, a thunderstorm caused an estimated 3 million dollars in crop damage. Hail, the largest being baseball size, was reported in drifts of three to four feet high. About 70 thousand acres of cropland and pastures were completely destroyed. Pheasants, ducks were killed by the hail and many cattle injured. Many windows were broken in homes, holes were punched in mobile homes, damaged occurred to contents of homes from hail which entered through windows, and many vehicles were extensively damaged.

June 12, 2013:

A line of thunderstorms moving northeast across the region brought damaging wind gusts from 60 to 80 mph to parts of central and northeast South Dakota. Many branches along with several trees were downed. Some buildings were also damaged with a couple buildings destroyed. A cabin on the east shore of the Missouri River and north-northwest of Pierre was destroyed by an estimated eighty mph wind. A hundred foot by seventy-five foot storage building was flattened south of Doland in Spink County. Tractors and planters and other equipment in the building were damaged.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 103 (1956) Aberdeen: 37 (2012)
Kennebec: 105 (1956) Kennebec: 38 (1969)
Mobridge: 98 (1952) Mobridge: 40 (1947)
Pierre: 104 (1956) Pierre: 39 (1969)
Sisseton: 97 (1976) Sisseton: 40 (2012)
Timber Lake: 100 (1952) Timber Lake: 39 (1985)
Watertown: 98 (1956) Watertown: 36 (1897)
Wheaton: 98 (1956) Wheaton: 39 (1927)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 3.25" (1915)
Kennebec: 2.58" (1937)
Mobridge: 3.47" (1915)
Pierre: 1.47" (1977)
Sisseton: 2.43" (1937)
Timber Lake: 2.50" (1928)
Watertown: 1.15" (1932)
Wheaton: 1.31" (2008)


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