This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 14 July 1872 → This day broke an 18-day stretch of 90 degree temperatures in the state of Washington, where the average July temperature is a mere 70.
 14 July 1911 → The greatest 24 hour rainfall in Asia occurred when 46 inches fell on Baguio, Luzon, Philippines.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


June 22, 1916:

An estimated F2 tornado moved northeast from 4 miles east of Willow Lakes to east of Vienna. A farmhouse was picked up and thrown into a granary. A boy was smothered to death by grains as a barn collapsed on him, one mile south of Vienna.

June 22, 1996:

From the morning through the late afternoon hours, several supercell thunderstorms moved southeast along a strong warm front from eastern Corson County to southwest Deuel County. These storms produced several tornados, large hail, very heavy rains, and damaging winds. Hail up to the size of baseballs and winds gusting to 70 mph damaged and destroyed thousands of acres of crops, broke windows in homes, buildings, and vehicles. Many roofs were damaged and trees were downed from near Mobridge to Redfield to Toronto. The most extensive crop, building, and tree damage was around the areas of Redfield, Vienna, Naples, Hazel, Bryant, Henry, Lake Norden, Castlewood, Estelline, and Toronto all south of Highway 212. The hail swaths of destruction were as much as 10 miles wide in places. Some farmers said you could not tell what was planted because the crops were completely destroyed. Hail piles of one to two feet were reported in some places. Also, most of the area from Redfield to Toronto received one to three inches of rain which caused some flooding problems.

June 22, 2003:

A hailstone measured 7 inches in diameter and 18.75 inches in circumference, both setting a new record. This massive hailstone fell in the town of Aurora, Nebraska. The previous record hailstone fell in Coffeyville, Kansas on September 3, 1970 with a diameter of 5.7 inched and a circumference of 17.5 inches.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 104 (1911) Aberdeen: 39 (1905)
Kennebec: 107 (1988) Kennebec: 42 (1942)
Mobridge: 104 (1911) Mobridge: 40 (1942)
Pierre: 104 (1937) Pierre: 42 (1942)
Sisseton: 101 (1988) Sisseton: 36 (1905)
Timber Lake: 99 (1933) Timber Lake: 39 (1942)
Watertown: 99 (1988) Watertown: 34 (1902)
Wheaton: 99 (1988) Wheaton: 42 (1918)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.40" (1931)
Kennebec: 1.19" (1964)
Mobridge: 1.35" (1931)
Pierre: 1.28" (1995)
Sisseton: 1.87" (1948)
Timber Lake: 1.48" (1995)
Watertown: 1.89" (1948)
Wheaton: 1.23" (1990)


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