This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 28 July 1945 → A B-25 bomber crashed into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building due to reduced visibility from thick fog. Three people on the plane and 11 people in the building were killed. A million dollars damage was done though the building's integrity was not compromised.
 28 July 1952 → A severe storm with hail up to an inch and a half in diameter broke windows, ruined roofs, and stripped trees of leaves near Benson, AZ. The temperature dropped to 37 degrees, and hail was three to four inches deep with drifts 46 inches high.
 28 July 1997 → Fort Collins, CO was inundated by a flood that sent a 20-foot wall of water rushing through the city. Five people died.

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March 21, 1997:

As temperatures began to warm up towards the end of March, the near record to record winter snowpack over central, north central, and northeast South Dakota began melting. The resulting runoff filled up ditches, lakes, creeks, streams, and low-lying areas. The massive amount of water swamped hundreds of sections of county and township roads as well as several state and federal highways. The inundated sections of roads were either broken up or washed out. Tens of culverts were blown out or damaged; and several bridges were either damaged or washed out by chunks of ice and the high water flow. Road closures were extensive, with rerouting taking place for school buses, mail carriers, farmers, and ranchers. Many spillways and dams received some damage or were washed out. In addition, thousands of acres of farmland and pastureland were underwater. Due to the high groundwater, a countless number of homes received water in their basements. A few towns were partially flooded, including Twin Brooks in Grant County, Corona in Roberts County, and Raymond in Clark County. The following week, in the early morning hours of March 27, water flowed into Raymond filling the basements of several homes. In rural areas, several farms were surrounded by water and were inaccessible, leaving some people stranded and livestock marooned. Many other residences and businesses, mainly across northeast South Dakota, received significant damage or were a total loss. As a result, several people had to be evacuated. At the time, many long-term residents said this was the most significant flooding they had seen in their lifetimes. The flooding continued into early to mid April.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 79 (1907) Aberdeen: -12 (1965)
Kennebec: 88 (1910) Kennebec: -19 (1965)
Mobridge: 75 (1945) Mobridge: -8 (1913)
Pierre: 80 (1939) Pierre: -6 (1965)
Sisseton: 70 (2012) Sisseton: -5 (1965)
Timber Lake: 76 (1945) Timber Lake: -12 (1913)
Watertown: 78 (1910) Watertown: -11 (1965)
Wheaton: 72 (1928) Wheaton: -8 (1965)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 1.60" (1894) Aberdeen: 8.0" (1894)
Kennebec: 0.90" (1987) Kennebec: 2.0" (1950)
Mobridge: 0.38" (1946) Mobridge: 3.0" (1914)
Pierre: 0.64" (1894) Pierre: 4.3" (1993)
Sisseton: 0.42" (2008) Sisseton: 10.7" (2008)
Timber Lake: 1.15" (1916) Timber Lake: 5.5" (1916)
Watertown: 0.23" (1992) Watertown: 4.7" (1992)
Wheaton: 0.64" (2008) Wheaton: 12.0" (2008)


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