This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 29 December 1894 → Temperatures fell into the 10 to 15 degree range in northern Florida. Tallahassee remained below freezing for the entire day.
 29 December 1942 → One of the worst ice storms to hit eastern Ontario, southern Quebec, and northern New York in 100 years was underway. More than 1 inch of ice brought the area to a standstill for several days. Outlying areas were reported to be a mass of tangled wires and trees. Telephone wires were covered by ice as thick as a person's wrist. Cornwall, ON, was without power for 10 days.
 29 December 1964 → Wind speeds over 100 mph buffeted the eastern shores of Australia as a small but intense storm moved up the country's Pacific coast. The combination of the powerful winds and large hail resulted in great destruction to trees and structures.

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March 25, 1997:

Snowmelt runoff and ice jamming caused the Elm River to rise above flood stage in the early evening of March 25th. The Elm River at Westport rose to 21.5 ft on March 30th, over 7 ft above flood stage. Most of the town of Westport was flooded and most people were evacuated. Only 4 out of 40 families stayed in their homes. Almost every home in Westport received major damage. This was the worst flooding at Westport since 1969. Also, three residences in Ordway were evacuated. At both Westport and Ordway, extensive sandbagging was done to no avail. Flooding on the Elm River continued into early April.

March 25, 1997:

Rapid snowmelt and ice jamming caused the Elm River near Westport to rise above flood stage on March 20th. The Elm River reached an all time record level of 22.69 feet on March 25th almost 9 feet above flood stage. The previous record was 22.11 feet set on Apri1 10th, 1969. The flood stage for the Elm River at Westport is 14 feet. The city of Westport was evacuated with the flood waters causing damage to many homes and roads in and around Westport. Also, many other roads and agricultural and pastureland along the river were flooded. The Elm River slowly receded and fell below flood stage on March 30th. The flood waters from the Elm River flowed south and into the northern portion of Moccasin Creek. Subsequently, the Moccasin Creek rose as the water flowed south into the city of Aberdeen. Flooding became a concern for Aberdeen and for areas along the creek north of Aberdeen. The Governor signed an emergency declaration which allowed the state to help with flood response efforts, including sending 50,000 sandbags to the area. Also, the National Guard was activated to move a variety of heavy equipment. Some sandbagging and a falling Elm River kept the Moccasin Creek from causing any significant flooding in and north of Aberdeen. Some township and county roads were flooded by the creek.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 81 (1925) Aberdeen: -10 (1894)
Kennebec: 83 (1907) Kennebec: -15 (1893)
Mobridge: 78 (1939) Mobridge: -8 (1964)
Pierre: 82 (1939) Pierre: -2 (1964)
Sisseton: 79 (1939) Sisseton: -10 (1964)
Timber Lake: 77 (2007) Timber Lake: -12 (1964)
Watertown: 81 (1939) Watertown: -8 (1894)
Wheaton: 75 (1968) Wheaton: -5 (1955)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 1.48" (1942) Aberdeen: 5.0" (1933)
Kennebec: 0.93" (1950) Kennebec: 6.0" (1987)
Mobridge: 0.76" (1942) Mobridge: 8.0" (1942)
Pierre: 0.67" (1942) Pierre: 3.0" (1942)
Sisseton: 0.80" (1900) Sisseton: 5.0" (1949)
Timber Lake: 0.73" (1945) Timber Lake: 4.0" (1987)
Watertown: 1.06" (1942) Watertown: 2.2" (1954)
Wheaton: 1.16" (1942) Wheaton: 7.0" (1996)


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