This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 17 September 1932 → A tropical storm struck the Annapolis Valley in the Canadian Maritimes, destroying 300,000 barrels of apples in Nova Scotia. A second tropical storm would strike Nova Scotia just seven days later.
 17 September 1936 → Tropical storm remnants brought up to 30 inches of rain to central Texas, resulting in massive flooding. In San Angelo the Concho River reached one of its highest stages on record and inundated the city. One thousand homes were damaged or destroyed, two bridges were swept away, and there were 100 rescues performed. Water was six feet deep in the lobby of the Naylor Hotel.
 17 September 1947 → The Fort Lauderdale Hurricane struck the east coast of Florida as a high-end Category 4, resulting in 51 fatalities. Hurricane force winds extended 120 miles out from the center, and produced the highest measured ground wind speeds in a Florida hurricane until Hurricane Andrew. The storm then crossed the Gulf of Mexico and produced 110 mph winds at New Orleans.
 17 September 2004 → Flooding and mudslides killed more than 3,000 people in Haiti in Hurricane Jeanne.

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May 2, 1983:

Severe thunderstorms produced 21 tornadoes across the northeastern states of Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. One tornado even occurred in Ontario, Canada. Of the 21 tornadoes in the United States, 9 were rated F3 and 6 were rated F2. The tornadoes caused 5 deaths.

May 2, 1984:

Strong winds picked up a trailer home northwest of the Pierre Airport and hurled it through the air, smashing it to the ground 50 yards away. The upper sections of a home were damaged by the air borne trailer. Several branches and shed roofs were also damaged nearby.

May 2, 2010:

May began with two days of historic rainfall over much of middle Tennessee, with the heaviest swath stretching along the I-40 corridor from Benton County to Davidson County. Some areas received nearly 20 inches of rain in this 2-day period, the highest of which was 19.41 inches reported by a CoCoRaHS observer in Camden, TN. Numerous rainfall records were broken at the Nashville International Airport, including the most rain received in a 6 hour period, highest calendar day rainfall, and wettest month, along with several others. Incredibly, the Nashville Airport experienced its wettest and third wettest days in history on back to back days. Many area rivers exceeded their record crest levels, including the Harpeth River near Kingston Springs which rose to 13.8 feet above the previous record. The Cumberland River at Nashville reached its highest level since flood control was implemented in the late 1960s, flooding parts of downtown Nashville. Waters from the Cumberland reached as far inland as 2nd Avenue, flooding many downtown businesses. Forty-nine Tennessee counties were declared disaster areas with damage estimates of between $2 and $3 billion statewide. Many Nashville landmarks received damage from floodwaters, including Gaylord Opryland Hotel and the Grand Ole Opry. Other popular Nashville landmarks affected by the floods include LP Field, Bridgestone Arena, the Country Music Hall of Fame, and the Schermerhorn Symphony Center, which received damage to the basement and its contents, including two Steinway grand pianos and the console of the Martin Foundation Concert Organ. Over $300 million in Federal Disaster Assistance has been approved for the people of Tennessee.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 90 (1955) Aberdeen: 20 (1909)
Kennebec: 97 (1959) Kennebec: 17 (1909)
Mobridge: 93 (1918) Mobridge: 20 (2011)
Pierre: 92 (1955) Pierre: 23 (1967)
Sisseton: 92 (1955) Sisseton: 22 (1967)
Timber Lake: 89 (1955) Timber Lake: 19 (1967)
Watertown: 89 (1955) Watertown: 17 (1911)
Wheaton: 99 (1959) Wheaton: 21 (1967)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 1.10" (1899) Aberdeen: 3.0" (1907)
Kennebec: 1.76" (1946) Kennebec: 1.0" (1916)
Mobridge: 1.22" (1964) Mobridge: 0.5" (1954)
Pierre: 1.76" (1964) Pierre: 0.6" (1954)
Sisseton: 0.78" (1946) Sisseton: 9.0" (1935)
Timber Lake: 1.85" (2008) Timber Lake: 1.0" (2008)
Watertown: 0.85" (1941) Watertown: 3.0" (1954)
Wheaton: 1.02" (1935) Wheaton: 4.0" (1954)


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