This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 28 December 1879 → All 74 lives were lost when a passenger train plunged from the Tay Bridge (Dundee, Scotland) into the Tay Estuary as the middle section of the bridge collapsed. Although the bridge was poorly constructed and had already been weakened in earlier gales (including the pre-existing winds at the time of the tragedy), the ultimate failure is believed to have been caused by two or three waterspouts which were sighted close to the bridge immediately before the accident.
 28 December 1999 → From the 26th to the 28th two incredibly powerful wind storms tore through northern and western Europe. Winds were over 100 mph in France, Germany, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Devastation to trees, power grids, and buildings was widespread. 140 people lost their lives.
 28 December 2003 → A severe snow storm hit northern California and southern Oregon. As much as 2 feet of snow fell along Interstate 5 closing a 150-mile stretch of the highway, stranding hundreds of travelers. Winds from the storm caused power outages to more than 200,000 customers. One man died of a heart attack after helping other drivers.

This Day in Weather History Archive

On This Day In

                   Weather History...


May 2, 1983:

Severe thunderstorms produced 21 tornadoes across the northeastern states of Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. One tornado even occurred in Ontario, Canada. Of the 21 tornadoes in the United States, 9 were rated F3 and 6 were rated F2. The tornadoes caused 5 deaths.

May 2, 1984:

Strong winds picked up a trailer home northwest of the Pierre Airport and hurled it through the air, smashing it to the ground 50 yards away. The upper sections of a home were damaged by the air borne trailer. Several branches and shed roofs were also damaged nearby.

May 2, 2010:

May began with two days of historic rainfall over much of middle Tennessee, with the heaviest swath stretching along the I-40 corridor from Benton County to Davidson County. Some areas received nearly 20 inches of rain in this 2-day period, the highest of which was 19.41 inches reported by a CoCoRaHS observer in Camden, TN. Numerous rainfall records were broken at the Nashville International Airport, including the most rain received in a 6 hour period, highest calendar day rainfall, and wettest month, along with several others. Incredibly, the Nashville Airport experienced its wettest and third wettest days in history on back to back days. Many area rivers exceeded their record crest levels, including the Harpeth River near Kingston Springs which rose to 13.8 feet above the previous record. The Cumberland River at Nashville reached its highest level since flood control was implemented in the late 1960s, flooding parts of downtown Nashville. Waters from the Cumberland reached as far inland as 2nd Avenue, flooding many downtown businesses. Forty-nine Tennessee counties were declared disaster areas with damage estimates of between $2 and $3 billion statewide. Many Nashville landmarks received damage from floodwaters, including Gaylord Opryland Hotel and the Grand Ole Opry. Other popular Nashville landmarks affected by the floods include LP Field, Bridgestone Arena, the Country Music Hall of Fame, and the Schermerhorn Symphony Center, which received damage to the basement and its contents, including two Steinway grand pianos and the console of the Martin Foundation Concert Organ. Over $300 million in Federal Disaster Assistance has been approved for the people of Tennessee.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 90 (1955) Aberdeen: 20 (1909)
Kennebec: 97 (1959) Kennebec: 17 (1909)
Mobridge: 93 (1918) Mobridge: 20 (2011)
Pierre: 92 (1955) Pierre: 23 (1967)
Sisseton: 92 (1955) Sisseton: 22 (1967)
Timber Lake: 89 (1955) Timber Lake: 19 (1967)
Watertown: 89 (1955) Watertown: 17 (1911)
Wheaton: 99 (1959) Wheaton: 21 (1967)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 1.10" (1899) Aberdeen: 3.0" (1907)
Kennebec: 1.76" (1946) Kennebec: 1.0" (1916)
Mobridge: 1.22" (1964) Mobridge: 0.5" (1954)
Pierre: 1.76" (1964) Pierre: 0.6" (1954)
Sisseton: 0.78" (1946) Sisseton: 9.0" (1935)
Timber Lake: 1.85" (2008) Timber Lake: 1.0" (2008)
Watertown: 0.85" (1941) Watertown: 3.0" (1954)
Wheaton: 1.02" (1935) Wheaton: 4.0" (1954)


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