This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 30 March 1805Snow rollers measuring 24 inches in diameter that are made when strong winds blow across a wet snow pack were seen in Battery Park in New York City.
 30 March 1938 → 10 people were killed and 200 injured when an F4 tornado devastated Columbus, KS. Near Hollow, OK a school was destroyed, but all the students were uninjured.
 30 March 2011 → Rainfall in Thailand reached 50 inches over a 5-day period, compared to a normal monthly average of 2 inches, killing 40 people.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


May 7, 1840:

The second deadliest single tornado in United States history occurred in Natchez, Mississippi. This tornado started in Concordia Parish, Louisiana, and moved up the Mississippi, killing 317 people.

May 7, 1896:

A strong, estimated F3 tornado moved northeast from 12 miles SSW of Clark, to 3 miles west of Watertown, to beyond Lake Kampeska. It was estimated to be on the ground for a distance of 30 miles. Near the start of the path, a woman was killed and 10 people were injured in one home. Parts of a home were found up to two miles away. Barns were leveled near Watertown.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 94 (1928) Aberdeen: 24 (1982)
Kennebec: 98 (1928) Kennebec: 23 (1976)
Mobridge: 94 (1992) Mobridge: 20 (1929)
Pierre: 95 (1963) Pierre: 23 (1943)
Sisseton: 109 (1934) Sisseton: 26 (1976)
Timber Lake: 92 (1992) Timber Lake: 22 (1943)
Watertown: 89 (1934) Watertown: 21 (1976)
Wheaton: 91 (1916) Wheaton: 24 (1929)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 1.24" (2000) Aberdeen: 8.0" (1907)
Kennebec: 1.14" (1933) Kennebec: 2.5" (1907)
Mobridge: 1.30" (1927)
Pierre: 1.24" (2000) Pierre: 1.5" (1907)
Sisseton: 1.23" (1993)
Timber Lake: 1.20" (1927) Timber Lake: 2.0" (1950)
Watertown: 1.55" (1978) Watertown: 3.0" (1907)
Wheaton: 0.55" (1932)


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