This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 27 November 1701 → Anders Celsius, the astronomer who invented the Celsius thermometer scale, was born in Uppsala, Sweden.
 27 November 1703 → The Great Storm of 1703 devastated southern England. Though strong gales buffeted the region from November 24 through December 2, the storm hit its peak on the morning of November 27. Winds to 120 mph blew down chimneys and church steeples, destroyed buildings, and felled countless thousands of trees. Four hundred windmills were shattered.
 27 November 1898 → The SS Portland passenger ship gave the name to the "Portland Gale" after the storm sunk the ship off the coast of Cape Cod, killing all 200 people aboard.
 27 November 1912 → Snow fell across northern Florida, marking one of the few times it has ever snowed there in November.

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May 12, 1984:

An F3 tornado wiped out seven farms, crippled fifteen others, killed livestock and scattered several cars and machinery in its path. The tornado first touched down seven miles north and one mile east of Clark and moved southeast through the southwestern sections of Henry until it dissipated at Grover in Codington County. Hail, three quarters inch on up to four inches was common in and near the tornado path. The path of destruction began on a farm where two barns, a steel grain bin and a pole barn were demolished and machinery was damaged. As the tornado moved further southeast, it struck the southwest sections of Henry and split into two tornados that moved in two different directions. One went to the northeast that inflicted no damaged and dissipated, while the other went southeast that continued its destruction path to Grover. Small hail, accumulation to fifteen inches deep, was experienced at Henry and tornado damage included broken windows, numerous homes and three trailer homes were demolished. Along the path, 80 power poles and several miles of power lines were lost, affecting the power to over 1,000 people. A small plane, southwest of Garden City was wrapped around a pole.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 90 (1900) Aberdeen: 17 (1946)
Kennebec: 95 (1894) Kennebec: 21 (1946)
Mobridge: 90 (1958) Mobridge: 18 (1943)
Pierre: 88 (1977) Pierre: 22 (1943)
Sisseton: 89 (1991) Sisseton: 19 (1946)
Timber Lake: 93 (1915) Timber Lake: 15 (1943)
Watertown: 87 (1900) Watertown: 19 (1946)
Wheaton: 90 (1991) Wheaton: 22 (1923)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.86" (2011) Aberdeen: 2.0" (1943)
Kennebec: 1.60" (2005)
Mobridge: 1.28" (2005)
Pierre: 1.10" (1920)
Sisseton: 2.20" (1998) Sisseton: 1.5" (1953)
Timber Lake: 1.60" (2005)
Watertown: 2.57" (1963) Watertown: 0.1" (1953)
Wheaton: 1.65" (1998)


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