This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 18 April 1880 → Marshfield, MO was devastated by an F4 (estimated) tornado that killed 68 people in the town in just a few minutes, with another 24 dying later of their injuries.
 18 April 1905 → Hail up to one inch in diameter, accompanied by strong winds that blew it into drifts six inches tall, struck Spanish Wells, Bahamas. Hail is exceedingly rare in the Bahamas.
 18 April 1906 → San Francisco was shaken by a severe earthquake. Unusual easterly winds helped to spread the ensuing fires, nearly destroying the city. The Weather Bureau offices at San Francisco and San Jose were demolished.
 18 April 1949 → Tornadoes are extremely rare in Nevada, however on this date a low-end F2 twister struck near Reno. It was on the ground for 12 miles and damaged ranch buildings.
 18 April 1957 → A dust devil in Massachusetts lifted a small child 3 feet into the air and rolled 2 other children on the ground. Fortunately none were hurt. The dust devil was accompanied by a loud whistling sound as it moved westward. It occurred at the beginning of an unusual early season heat wave.

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May 12, 1984:

An F3 tornado wiped out seven farms, crippled fifteen others, killed livestock and scattered several cars and machinery in its path. The tornado first touched down seven miles north and one mile east of Clark and moved southeast through the southwestern sections of Henry until it dissipated at Grover in Codington County. Hail, three quarters inch on up to four inches was common in and near the tornado path. The path of destruction began on a farm where two barns, a steel grain bin and a pole barn were demolished and machinery was damaged. As the tornado moved further southeast, it struck the southwest sections of Henry and split into two tornados that moved in two different directions. One went to the northeast that inflicted no damaged and dissipated, while the other went southeast that continued its destruction path to Grover. Small hail, accumulation to fifteen inches deep, was experienced at Henry and tornado damage included broken windows, numerous homes and three trailer homes were demolished. Along the path, 80 power poles and several miles of power lines were lost, affecting the power to over 1,000 people. A small plane, southwest of Garden City was wrapped around a pole.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 90 (1900) Aberdeen: 17 (1946)
Kennebec: 95 (1894) Kennebec: 21 (1946)
Mobridge: 90 (1958) Mobridge: 18 (1943)
Pierre: 88 (1977) Pierre: 22 (1943)
Sisseton: 89 (1991) Sisseton: 19 (1946)
Timber Lake: 93 (1915) Timber Lake: 15 (1943)
Watertown: 87 (1900) Watertown: 19 (1946)
Wheaton: 90 (1991) Wheaton: 22 (1923)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.86" (2011) Aberdeen: 2.0" (1943)
Kennebec: 1.60" (2005)
Mobridge: 1.28" (2005)
Pierre: 1.10" (1920)
Sisseton: 2.20" (1998) Sisseton: 1.5" (1953)
Timber Lake: 1.60" (2005)
Watertown: 2.57" (1963) Watertown: 0.1" (1953)
Wheaton: 1.65" (1998)


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