This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 4 March 1841 → President William Henry Harrison delivered a 100-minute inaugural address in near-freezing temperatures while refusing to wear a coat or hat. Though probably not directly related to the weather on Inauguration Day, he soon became ill, possibly from pneumonia, and died on April 4, only 30 days into his presidency.
 4 March 1899 → The world's highest recorded storm surge occurred at Bathurst Bay, Queensland, Australia when Tropical Cyclone Mahina created a surge 43 feet deep. The storm also caused the largest death toll of any natural disaster in Australian history, with 400 casualties.
 4 March 1909 → The Inauguration ceremony of President William H. Taft was forced indoors due to a blizzard that dropped 10 inches of snow on the Capital. Strong winds toppled trees and telephone poles. All activity was brought to a standstill. It took 6,000 men and 500 wagons to clear 58,000 tons of snow and slush from the parade route. Just after the swearing-in, the snow tapered off.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


May 17, 1902:

An estimated F3 Tornado moved northeast from 6 miles southwest of Mina to just south of Westport, a distance of about 25 miles. A four year old girl was killed in one of two farm houses blown apart in Edmunds County. Three more homes were damaged in Brown County. There were probably two if not three separate tornadoes involved.

May 17, 1937:

A complex of tornadoes and downbursts skipped southeast from near Roslyn and Greenville. This storm also caused $50,000 in damage in downtown Waubay and damaged farm property to about 4 miles west of Gray, Minnesota. About 20 barns were destroyed. Sheep and horses were killed. These events traveled a distance of about 70 miles. The strongest tornado was estimated at F2 strength.

May 17, 1996:

An F1 tornado touched down 20 miles southeast of Wilmot or 5 miles northwest of Ortonville, Minnesota at Schmidts Landing on Big Stone Lake. The roof was ripped off of a house and a garage wall was blown off its foundation. Thee RV's were demolished a trailer was overturned and destroyed. This tornado moved into Big Stone County and intensified. An F3 tornado crossed Big Stone Lake from Roberts County, South Dakota destroying on cabin at the Meadowbrook Resort. It also blew the roof off another cabin, and third cabin was demolished when a tree fell onto it. Several boats on Big Stone Lake were overturned. Approximately 150 buildings sustained damage or were destroyed as the tornado moved northeast across Big Stone County. Southwest of Clinton, a pontoon boat and a camper were destroyed. East of Clinton, a farm lost all buildings with severe damage to their home. Estimated property damage was listed at $1.5 million. A wind gust of 90 mph blew two garage roofs off, destroyed an antenna, blew large trees down, and also a grain dryer was blown down near Dumont, Minnesota.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 103 (1934) Aberdeen: 27 (1925)
Kennebec: 106 (1934) Kennebec: 20 (1925)
Mobridge: 100 (1934) Mobridge: 26 (1930)
Pierre: 103 (1934) Pierre: 32 (2002)
Sisseton: 98 (1934) Sisseton: 29 (2002)
Timber Lake: 92 (1970) Timber Lake: 23 (1930)
Watertown: 99 (1934) Watertown: 21 (1925)
Wheaton: 91 (1972) Wheaton: 25 (1930)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 3.81" (1949)
Kennebec: 4.45" (1898)
Mobridge: 1.01" (2005)
Pierre: 1.02" (2000)
Sisseton: 1.30" (1996)
Timber Lake: 1.47" (1942)
Watertown: 1.19" (1961)
Wheaton: 0.59" (1921)


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