This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 2 October 1894 → What was likely an F3 tornado ripped apart several blocks of Little Rock, AR as it tore right through downtown. The funnel passed over or very near the Weather Bureau office at 8:28pm, providing a rare look at how barometric pressure behaves in a tornado. The office's instrument shelter was blown away and windows shattered. Debris from the upper floor of a nearby building showered down on the observer's office.
 2 October 1898 → A hurricane striking the Georgia coast washed away Campbell Island. Jekyll Island had a storm surge of 19 feet. It is estimated that this storm was a category 3 or 4 hurricane with winds around 130 mph.

This Day in Weather History Archive

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                   Weather History...


May 18, 1918:

An estimated F2 tornado moved NNE from 5 miles NNW of Ferney, across the eastern edge of Groton. Homes were unroofed and barns were destroyed. Nine farms lost buildings. One man was injured in a barn, another in a car that was thrown from the road. Estimated damage was set at $60,000. Tornadoes were also seen in Lincoln and Sanborn Counties in South Dakota. Also, an estimated F2 tornado moved northeast through the townships of Akron and Artichoke in Big Stone County, Minnesota. About 300 farms had tornado damage. The funnel dissipated on Artichoke Lake.

May 18, 1960:

Pierre received 1.96 inches of rain in less than 30 minutes which caused flash flooding. About 30 basements were flooded with extensive cave in damage at one home. Flash flooding from 2 to 3 inches of rain occurred near Presho, washing out county roads, three bridges and a grain storage bin. Gettysburg also received 2.5 inches of rain.

May 18, 1996:

A brief F0 tornado touchdown and cut a narrow path from 2 miles east of Willow Lake with no damage reported. A 100 mph wind gust blew down 38 large trees on Highway 81 from the junction of Lake Norden corner on Highway 28 to the junction of the Hayti corner. Also, 4 double posted and 5 single posted signs were broken off and 1 single posted steel sign was bent over.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 100 (1934) Aberdeen: 26 (1915)
Kennebec: 104 (1934) Kennebec: 25 (2002)
Mobridge: 98 (1934) Mobridge: 26 (1915)
Pierre: 103 (1934) Pierre: 26 (2002)
Sisseton: 98 (1934) Sisseton: 31 (1968)
Timber Lake: 95 (1941) Timber Lake: 25 (1915)
Watertown: 94 (1934) Watertown: 25 (2002)
Wheaton: 91 (1972) Wheaton: 27 (1924)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.27" (1950)
Kennebec: 0.98" (1960)
Mobridge: 0.55" (1951)
Pierre: 1.96" (1960)
Sisseton: 0.60" (1962)
Timber Lake: 0.80" (2005)
Watertown: 1.35" (1962)
Wheaton: 1.60" (1962)


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