This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 12 July 1950 → The U.S. Weather Bureau lifted its self-imposed ban on using the word "tornado" in forecasts.
 12 July 1984 → A golfer in Tucson, AZ was killed as he was struck by lightning, even though it was not raining within 3 miles of where he was.
 12 July 1984 → A severe thunderstorm moved across Germany and pounded Munich with hail. For 20 minutes hail averaged 2 inches in diameter, but hail stones up to five and half inches fell. The hailstorm caused damage to 700,000 homes and 200,000 cars, estimated at more than $1 billion. It is the most expensive natural catastrophe to ever occur in Germany.

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May 24, 1960:

A tornado touched down about 7 miles northwest of Roscoe and destroyed a small shed near a country schoolhouse. Funnel clouds were also observed in Hosmer area, near Eureka, and 30 miles West of Aberdeen. An unofficial report of 4 inches of rain fell at Hosmer.

May 24, 2008:

A supercell thunderstorm produced seven tornadoes in Dewey County. Since these tornadoes remained in open country, all were rated EF0.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 99 (1926) Aberdeen: 25 (1897)
Kennebec: 105 (1926) Kennebec: 19 (1924)
Mobridge: 90 (1928) Mobridge: 24 (2002)
Pierre: 90 (1959) Pierre: 28 (2002)
Sisseton: 90 (2010) Sisseton: 26 (2002)
Timber Lake: 99 (1926) Timber Lake: 29 (2002)
Watertown: 95 (1926) Watertown: 20 (1897)
Wheaton: 94 (1950) Wheaton: 28 (1924)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 0.71" (1973)
Kennebec: 0.93" (1965)
Mobridge: 2.71" (1944)
Pierre: 1.70" (1944)
Sisseton: 2.73" (1973)
Timber Lake: 1.07" (1987)
Watertown: 1.30" (1906)
Wheaton: 1.42" (1973)


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