This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 17 September 1932 → A tropical storm struck the Annapolis Valley in the Canadian Maritimes, destroying 300,000 barrels of apples in Nova Scotia. A second tropical storm would strike Nova Scotia just seven days later.
 17 September 1936 → Tropical storm remnants brought up to 30 inches of rain to central Texas, resulting in massive flooding. In San Angelo the Concho River reached one of its highest stages on record and inundated the city. One thousand homes were damaged or destroyed, two bridges were swept away, and there were 100 rescues performed. Water was six feet deep in the lobby of the Naylor Hotel.
 17 September 1947 → The Fort Lauderdale Hurricane struck the east coast of Florida as a high-end Category 4, resulting in 51 fatalities. Hurricane force winds extended 120 miles out from the center, and produced the highest measured ground wind speeds in a Florida hurricane until Hurricane Andrew. The storm then crossed the Gulf of Mexico and produced 110 mph winds at New Orleans.
 17 September 2004 → Flooding and mudslides killed more than 3,000 people in Haiti in Hurricane Jeanne.

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November 16, 1989:

There was massive devastation at the Jones Valley School in Huntsville, Alabama after an F4 tornado plowed through the southern portion of the city. The tornado killed 21 people and injured 463 along its 18.5 mile path. Most of the deaths, injuries, and damage occurred along a one mile segment through a congested business area along Airport Road. At the school, which lost all of its second floor, classed had already let out for the day when the tornado struck, so there were 12 adults and 37 children in the building, all of whom survived by taking refuge on the lower level.

November 16, 1996:

A strong area of low pressure brought 6 to 9 inches of snowfall to most of central and parts of north central South Dakota on the 16th, while widespread freezing rain associated with the warm front of the system, along with 4 to 10 inches of snow, fell in northeast South Dakota. Travel was significantly affected, and a few minor accidents occurred during the storm. Several sporting events and activities were also postponed or cancelled. Strong north winds late on the 16th into early the 17th resulted in near-blizzard conditions across northeast South Dakota. Some storm total snowfall amounts include; 9.0 inches 12SSW of Harrold; 8.5 inches near Highmore; 8.2 inches in Roscoe; 8.0 in Eureka; 7.9 inches near Mellette; 7.0 inches in Waubay; 6.5 inches in Murdo and Redfield; 6.0 inches in Kennebec and Miller; 5.5 inches near Victor; and 5.3 inches in Sisseton.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 71 (2001) Aberdeen: -12 (1955)
Kennebec: 76 (2001) Kennebec: -10 (1959)
Mobridge: 69 (1953) Mobridge: -10 (1959)
Pierre: 75 (2001) Pierre: -10 (1959)
Sisseton: 74 (2001) Sisseton: -7 (1959)
Timber Lake: 70 (1939) Timber Lake: -13 (1959)
Watertown: 70 (2001) Watertown: -8 (1959)
Wheaton: 75 (1953) Wheaton: -8 (1932)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.55" (1987) Aberdeen: 5.5" (1987)
Kennebec: 0.30" (1996) Kennebec: 5.0" (1996)
Mobridge: 0.39" (1971) Mobridge: 3.0" (1911)
Pierre: 0.62" (1996) Pierre: 6.2" (1996)
Sisseton: 0.62" (1987) Sisseton: 4.0" (1985)
Timber Lake: 0.50" (1971) Timber Lake: 3.0" (1911)
Watertown: 1.12" (1971) Watertown: 6.0" (1985)
Wheaton: 1.20" (1930) Wheaton: 4.0" (1985)"


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