This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 31 July 1861 → The world record for one-year rainfall was set: 1,042 inches at Cherrapunji, India.
 31 July 1964 → Country singer "Gentleman Jim" Reeves flew his single-engine Beechcraft plane into a thunderstorm near Brentwood, TN. The plane crashed, killing Reeves and his manager. Reeves was 40 years old at the time of the crash.
 31 July 1976 → A stationary thunderstorm produced more than 10 inches of rain which funneled into the narrow Thompson River Canyon of northeastern Colorado. A mass of water 20 feet high and traveling at 50 mph wreaked a 25 mile path of destruction from Estes Park to Loveland. 144 people were killed, mostly in vehicles. Ten miles of U.S. Highway 34 were totally destroyed.
 31 July 1993 → Alabama finished its hottest July on record since 1879, while receiving less than half the normal rainfall. Meanwhile, the Great Flood of 1993 was reaching its peak in the Midwest and was eventually responsible for 48 deaths and $23.1 billion in damage.

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November 19, 1981:

A storm system moved from southeast Nebraska through Iowa on the 18th and spread rain and sleet as well as a few thunderstorms into southern Minnesota. Rain and sleet began changing over to snow during the afternoon on the 18th and continued through the 19th. The heaviest snowfall was in the Minneapolis area. The 10.4 inches of snow reported from the National Weather Service office in the Twin Cities was the heaviest snowfall recorded at the office since March 22nd, to the23rd, 1965 when 13.6 inches fell. The storm knocked out power and phones to many in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Damage was also done to the Humber H. Humphrey Metrodome, where the weight of the heavy snow caused the newly inflated, fabric dome collapsed and ripped.

November 19, 1996:

Widespread freezing rain spread a layer of ice across a large area before changing over to snow during the period of November 19-20. Snowfall amounts were generally 1 to 3 inches in central South Dakota, 3 to 7 inches across north central South Dakota, 5 to 6 inches in west central Minnesota, and 4 to 12 inches across northeast South Dakota. Travel was difficult and several schools were closed or delayed. Mail delivery was also slowed or delayed for a day or two. Several, mainly minor accidents, resulting in several minor injuries, occurred as a result of the ice and snow covered roads. Two Milbank buses slid into ditches. Strong north winds resulted in near-blizzard conditions across northeast South Dakota on the 20th. Some snowfall totals included; 12.0 inches in Clear Lake and near Milbank; 10.1 inches near Mellette; 9.0 inches in Browns Valley; 8.3 inches near Big Stone City; 8.0 inches in Faulkton; and 7.0 inches in Britton and Conde.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 72 (1897) Aberdeen: -11 (1914)
Kennebec: 72 (2003) Kennebec: -7 (1914)
Mobridge: 68 (1917) Mobridge: -1 (1914)
Pierre: 70 (2003) Pierre: 4 (1955)
Sisseton: 64 (1989) Sisseton: -10 (1932)
Timber Lake: 68 (2003) Timber Lake: -9 (1914)
Watertown: 66 (1897) Watertown: -9 (1914)
Wheaton: 66 (1917) Wheaton: -11 (1932)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.56" (1977) Aberdeen: 6.8" (1977)
Kennebec: 0.22" (1947) Kennebec: 3.0" (1947)
Mobridge: 0.67" (1977) Mobridge: 6.8" (1977)
Pierre: 0.20" (1985) Pierre: 2.7" (1947)
Sisseton: 0.41" (1977) Sisseton: 5.0" (1992)
Timber Lake: 0.85" (1977) Timber Lake: 12.0" (1930)
Watertown: 0.73" (1983) Watertown: 3.9" (1992)
Wheaton: 0.54" (1992) Wheaton: 7.0" (1992)"


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