This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 18 April 1880 → Marshfield, MO was devastated by an F4 (estimated) tornado that killed 68 people in the town in just a few minutes, with another 24 dying later of their injuries.
 18 April 1905 → Hail up to one inch in diameter, accompanied by strong winds that blew it into drifts six inches tall, struck Spanish Wells, Bahamas. Hail is exceedingly rare in the Bahamas.
 18 April 1906 → San Francisco was shaken by a severe earthquake. Unusual easterly winds helped to spread the ensuing fires, nearly destroying the city. The Weather Bureau offices at San Francisco and San Jose were demolished.
 18 April 1949 → Tornadoes are extremely rare in Nevada, however on this date a low-end F2 twister struck near Reno. It was on the ground for 12 miles and damaged ranch buildings.
 18 April 1957 → A dust devil in Massachusetts lifted a small child 3 feet into the air and rolled 2 other children on the ground. Fortunately none were hurt. The dust devil was accompanied by a loud whistling sound as it moved westward. It occurred at the beginning of an unusual early season heat wave.

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November 24, 1993:

A major slow-moving storm system traveled across the upper Midwest during the Thanksgiving holiday, dumping heavy snow across most of South Dakota and Minnesota from November 24 through the 27th. The heaviest amounts of two to three feet occurred in northeast South Dakota. Over a foot of snow accumulated in west central Minnesota, and needless to say, travel became extremely difficult across the entire area. Storm total snowfall amounts included 31.8 inches at Westport, 29.5 inches at Leola, 28 inches at Britton, 25.3 inches at Aberdeen, 24.3 inches at Mellette, 24.0 inches at McLaughlin, and 22.0 inches near Victor. The snowfall of 25.3 inches at Aberdeen was a single storm record (that still stands today), and it made November 1993 one of the snowiest months on record in Aberdeen with a total of 30.1 inches of snowfall (only three months have recorded more snow: November 1898, February 1915, and November 2000). The storm closed numerous schools and offices on November 24th across the area, resulting in an early start to the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Some freezing rain and freezing drizzle preceded the snowstorm in southeast South Dakota from late on the 23rd to the 24th, causing at least 60 vehicle accidents. The heavy snow also clogged roads, causing vehicles to become stuck and resulting in numerous accidents. As a result of the heavy snow, low wind chills, and low visibilities, a 23-year old man was stranded in his pickup truck in a snow bank north of Aberdeen for 18 hours on the 23rd and 24th. The weight of snow collapsed numerous structures in northeast South Dakota from the 25th to the 26th. The roof of a metal bard collapsed two miles northwest of Aberdeen, killing one dairy cow in the barn. In Castlewood, a 100-foot by 40-foot metal pole shed fell in, causing damage to a grain truck inside. A machine shed also caved in on a farm east of Bowdle. During the afternoon of the 26th, part of the roof and wall of the Roscoe Senior Center collapsed, causing a near-total loss to the building. Strong northwest winds followed the snowstorm in western and central South Dakota, causing considerable blowing and drifting snow and wind chills as low as 50 degrees below zero. In North Dakota, over two feet of snow fell over a large part of central and southeastern portions of the state. Most of North Dakota had over a foot of snow from this storm. The greatest snowfall amount was reported at Oakes, in Dickey County where 31 inches fell. At the National Weather Service office in Bismarck, 28.3 inches of snow were measures during the 108 hour snow event. This amount set a new single storm record for snow in Bismarck. The snow began the evening on the 22nd and did not end until the morning of the 27th. Except for about six hours during the day on the 26th, the snow was continuous through this period. Fortunately, the wind was only 10 to 25 mph during this storm, so it was well below blizzard conditions and blowing and drifting of snow was not a problem.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 65 (1932) Aberdeen: -17 (1996)
Kennebec: 72 (1923) Kennebec: -18 (1985)
Mobridge: 76 (1914) Mobridge: -10 (2003)
Pierre: 70 (1990) Pierre: -9 (2003)
Sisseton: 70 (1984) Sisseton: -12 (1985)
Timber Lake: 65 (1932) Timber Lake: -18 (1985)
Watertown: 61 (1984) Watertown: -17 (1985)
Wheaton: 68 (1984) Wheaton: -17 (1951)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.75" (1908) Aberdeen: 12.0" (1993)
Kennebec: 1.19" (2001) Kennebec: 6.0" (1993)
Mobridge: 0.12" (1993) Mobridge: 2.8" (1977)
Pierre: 0.42" (1993) Pierre: 4.9" (1993)
Sisseton: 0.75" (2001) Sisseton: 9.0" (1993)
Timber Lake: 0.23" (1993) Timber Lake: 3.5" (1993)
Watertown: 0.38" (2001) Watertown: 6.3" (1993)
Wheaton: 0.48" (2001) Wheaton: 4.0" (1993)"


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