This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 26 January 1938 → The Niagara River's worst ice jam on record occurred at Niagara Falls, NY. The jam caused the Falls View Bridge to collapse, burying the Ontario Hydro-Electric Power Commission Plant under 18 feet of water and ice.
 26 January 1972 → Intense lake effect snow bands pounded Oswego, NY and produced amazing snowfall rates: 2.4 inches in 15 minutes, 4.8 inches in half an hour, 9.1 inches in an hour, and 16.5 inches in two hours.
 26 January 1980 → Grand Ilet, in the South Indian Ocean east of Madagascar, recorded the world record 12-hour rainfall as a whopping 46 inches fell.
 26 January 2011 → A record snowstorm hit three major U.S. cities; Philadelphia received 15.1 inches of snow, Washington D.C. received five inches of snow, and New York City reported one to two feet of snow in the region which shut down schools for only the 9th time since 1979.

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November 26, 1989:

Snow began falling in western South Dakota during the early evening of the 26th and swept across the state and into west central Minnesota that night and through much of the 27th. Almost two feet of snow fell in parts of the Black Hills, while one to two inches fell in the southeast part of South Dakota. Icy roads caused by rain that preceded the snow in central and eastern parts of the state combined with strong northerly winds on the 27th to make for dangerous traveling conditions. Numerous accidents were reported, and many cars went into ditches. Some of the heavier snow amounts in central, north central, and northeast South Dakota were reported at Leola with 6 inches; Mellette and Onida with 5 inches; and Eureka, Faulkton and Aberdeen with 4 inches.

November 26, 1989:

Freezing rain was widespread across eastern South Dakota. The area receiving the most freezing rain was across the northeast corner of the state between Aberdeen and Sisseton. Ice-covered roads in Aberdeen caused at least one traffic accident with one report of an injury.

November 26, 2001:

Heavy snow of 6 to 12 inches, along with strong north winds of 20 to 40 mph, caused near-blizzard conditions and difficult travel conditions across most of central and northeast South Dakota and west central Minnesota. Snowfall amounts were generally 6 to 12 inches in South Dakota and 10 to 14 inches in west central Minnesota. Most schools were closed or started late on both the 26th and 27th, and some businesses were also closed. Many flights were also delayed or canceled. Some snowfall amounts included 6 inches at Eagle Butte, Fort Thompson and Webster; 7 inches at Eureka, Onida, Doland, and Watertown; 8 inches at Highmore, Miller, Onaka, Castlewood, and Selby; 9 inches at Sisseton and Peever; 10 inches at Ortonville, Faulkton, Blunt, Murdo, Kennebec, and Stephan; 11 inches at Victor and Gettysburg; 12 inches at Milbank, White Rock, and Clear Lake; 13 inches at Wheaton; and 14 inches at Browns Valley.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 70 (1914) Aberdeen: -24 (1996)
Kennebec: 71 (1998) Kennebec: -6 (1985)
Mobridge: 65 (1914) Mobridge: -20 (1985)
Pierre: 69 (1998) Pierre: -6 (1985)
Sisseton: 59 (1988) Sisseton: -14 (1996)
Timber Lake: 66 (1998) Timber Lake: -15 (1985)
Watertown: 59 (1941) Watertown: -15 (1993)
Wheaton: 59 (1998) Wheaton: -9 (1977)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 1.00" (1896) Aberdeen: 6.4" (2001)
Kennebec: 0.45" (2001) Kennebec: 8.0" (2001)
Mobridge: 0.22" (1989) Mobridge: 4.0" (2001)
Pierre: 0.80" (2001) Pierre: 8.0" (2001)
Sisseton: 0.50" (2001) Sisseton: 8.5" (1971)
Timber Lake: 0.20" (2001) Timber Lake: 4.0" (1970)
Watertown: 0.42" (1965) Watertown: 3.0" (1965)
Wheaton: 1.10" (1953) Wheaton: 7.0" (1965)"


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