This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 27 December 1996 → One person was killed in a chain-reaction car accident that involved 50 vehicles on the Sunshine Skyway Bridge in Tampa Bay, FL. The accident was caused by dense fog in the area.
 27 December 2010 → A Christmas Blizzard in the eastern U.S. finally wound down after dropping one to three feet of snow from North Carolina to Maine. New Jersey was particularly hard hit with almost the entire state getting at least a foot, with Rahway getting 32 inches. Central Park in New York City was buried under 20 inches of snow. Winds at New London, CT gusted to 68 mph and to near 70 mph on Long Island, NY.

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November 30, 1981:

A two-day winter storm, beginning as rain, changing to freezing rain and then to snow, completely paralyzed the eastern half of South Dakota, as well as west central Minnesota Monday, November 30 through Tuesday, December 1, 1981. Snow accumulations of between eight and twelve inches were common in South Dakota. Wind with gusts to near 50 mph whipped the snow into blizzard conditions. The Governor of South Dakota closed east-west Interstate 90 to all traffic. Hundreds of motorists were stranded. One person died during snow removal after the storm. Some storm total snowfall amounts included 8 inches at Kennebec, 7 inches at Pierre and Faulkton, 4 inches at Aberdeen, and 2 inches at Watertown. The winter precipitation was caused by a storm center that moved from Kansas Monday through Iowa Monday night and into Wisconsin Tuesday morning, December 1st. The same storm produced heavy snow and blizzard conditions over a large area of the central Plains. Travel was especially difficult because of the snow. Many roads were impassible and motorists were forced to find shelter.

November 30, 1991:

The third major winter storm of the season moved from the central plains to eastern South Dakota. The storm generally dropped between 4 and 8 inches of snow over the eastern third of South Dakota from the 28th to the 30th. New snow accumulations of 2 to 5 inches occurred over most of the rest of the state. Some specific snow reports across the area included Aberdeen with 2 inches and Watertown with 3 inches. Five inches fell at Clear Lake and 3 inches fell near Summit. Strong winds developed after the snow fell, producing widespread blowing and drifting snow, especially across the northeast corner of South Dakota.

November 30, 2000:

Heavy snow of 6 to 12 inches fell across a large part of northern South Dakota and into western Big Stone County in Minnesota, causing travel problems and school closings. Several accidents also occurred due to the slippery roads. Some snowfall amounts included 6 inches at Milbank and Ortonville; 8 inches at McLaughlin, Ipswich, Summit, and Mellette; 9 inches northwest of Britton, Clear Lake, and Pollock; 10 inches at Leola and Faulkton; 11 inches at Aberdeen and Webster; and 12 inches at Houghton.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 66 (1995) Aberdeen: -27 (1964)
Kennebec: 66 (1932) Kennebec: -21 (1896)
Mobridge: 64 (1995) Mobridge: -10 (1960)
Pierre: 64 (1995) Pierre: -13 (1964)
Sisseton: 67 (1932) Sisseton: -18 (1964)
Timber Lake: 63 (1995) Timber Lake: -13 (1960)
Watertown: 59 (1932) Watertown: -20 (1964)
Wheaton: 58 (1995) Wheaton: -16 (1964)

Record Precipitation: Record Snowfall:
Aberdeen: 0.55" (2000) Aberdeen: 10.5" (2000)
Kennebec: 0.60" (1981) Kennebec: 6.0" (2005)
Mobridge: 0.20" (1914) Mobridge: 3.0" (2000)
Pierre: 0.67" (1981) Pierre: 6.7" (1981)
Sisseton: 0.16" (2000) Sisseton: 2.0" (2000)
Timber Lake: 0.70" (1914) Timber Lake: 5.5" (1914)
Watertown: 0.27" (1985) Watertown: 2.8" (1991)
Wheaton: 0.55" (1922) Wheaton: 2.0" (1991)"


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