This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 2 September 1935 → One of the most intense hurricanes to ever hit the U.S. struck the Florida Keys, packing 200 mph winds and killing 400 people. The hurricane produced a 15-foot tide and storm surge waves 30 feet high. The barometric pressure at Matecumbe Bay, FL hit a United States record low of 26.35 inches.
 2 September 2002 → In Ladysmith, WI businesses were closed because of Labor Day. An F3 tornado touched down and damaged the area. Fortunately, no one was killed. The Wisconsin towns of Gilman and Wausau were also struck.

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October 8, 1982:

October 8th and 9th, 1982 a record-breaking snowstorm for so early in the Fall paralyzed the northern Black Hills with three to six feet of heavy, wet snow and winds of 40 to 70 miles an hour. Some snowfall amounts included 41 inches at Galena, 36 inches at Lead, and 23 inches at Deadwood. Five to six feet of snow was common in the higher elevations. The heavy wet snow caused numerous problems. The roof of a clothing store in Lead collapsed under the weight of the snow and several other businesses were damaged. The roofs of at least three trailer homes also collapsed. The combination of strong winds and heavy snow broke tree branches (causing extensive timber damage), power lines and telephone poles. Damage was done to 40 miles of power lines, including 30 broken power poles. Some residents were without power for five days. The city of Deadwood was without electricity and fresh water for at least three days.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 87 (1936) Aberdeen: 9 (1895)
Kennebec: 93 (1954) Kennebec: 14 (1895)
Mobridge: 90 (1960) Mobridge: 19 (1946)
Pierre: 92 (1980) Pierre: 18 (2000)
Sisseton: 88 (1960) Sisseton: 18 (2000)
Timber Lake: 90 (1960) Timber Lake: 18 (1946)
Watertown: 84 (2010) Watertown: 13 (1917)
Wheaton: 89 (2003) Wheaton: 19 (1917)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.58" (1982)
Kennebec: 1.07" (1924)
Mobridge: 1.50" (1982) Mobridge: 0.2" (1932)
Pierre: 1.11" (1982)
Sisseton: 0.43" (1959)
Timber Lake: 0.88" (1982) Timber Lake: 1.0" (1932)
Watertown: 0.51" (1995) Watertown: 0.7" (1970)
Wheaton: 1.30" (2001)


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