This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 30 September 1971 → Known as the Grande Dame of Hurricanes, Hurricane Ginger was the longest lasting Atlantic hurricane of the 20th Century. She began her 27 day journey east of the Bahamas, went out to the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, then turned around and came back to the west. The storm struck the North Carolina coast on this date, bringing 10 inches of rain and $10 million in damage.
 30 September 1987 → South Bend, IN received a thunder snowstorm.

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October 15, 1987:

Unseasonably cold weather continued in the eastern U.S., with thirteen cities reporting record low temperatures for the date. The low of 34 degrees at Montgomery, Alambama was their coldest reading of record for so early in the season. Lows of 32 degrees at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and 34 degrees at Parkersburg West Virginia marked their third straight morning of record cold.

October 15, 1992:

Snow fell throughout the day across the north central and northwest part of the state with 2 to 7 inches occurring.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 88 (1958) Aberdeen: 18 (1992)
Kennebec: 94 (1958) Kennebec: 20 (1970)
Mobridge: 87 (1958) Mobridge: 24 (1970)
Pierre: 90 (1965) Pierre: 23 (1976)
Sisseton: 90 (1958) Sisseton: 10 (1937)
Timber Lake: 85 (1964) Timber Lake: 20 (1966)
Watertown: 88 (1958) Watertown: 19 (1992)
Wheaton: 89 (1958) Wheaton: 20 (1992)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.61" (1957) Aberdeen: 1.2" (1992)
Kennebec: 1.02" (1911)
Mobridge: 1.86" (1980) Mobridge: 2.3" (1992)
Pierre: 2.39" (1980)
Sisseton: 1.50" (1998) Sisseton: 1.2" (2009)
Timber Lake: 1.07" (1980) Timber Lake: 3.0" (1992)
Watertown: 2.20" (1899) Watertown: 0.1" (1992)
Wheaton: 1.70" (1984) Wheaton: 1.0" (1985)


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