This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 23 April 1792 → John Thomas Romney Robinson, inventor of the cup anemometer, was born.
 23 April 1908 → An extensive tornado outbreak began around noon today in Minnesota, and wouldn't end until the evening of the 25th in Georgia. The strongest tornado of the event was an F5 (estimated) near Pender, NE today where a farm was swept away and debris was found 35 miles distant.
 23 April 1910 → The temperature at the Civic Center in Los Angeles hit 100 degrees to establish an April record for the city.
 23 April 1988 → In southern California, a winter-like storm brought thunderstorms. Nine girls in Tustin were injured when lightning struck the tree they were standing under to shield themselves from the rain.

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October 23, 1995:

A major fall storm hit Central and Northeast South Dakota and dropped from four inches to one foot of wet snow. The heavy wet snow combined with strong winds gusting up to 50 mph snapped several thousand power poles and downed hundreds of miles of line in the counties of Buffalo, Hand, Spink, Roberts and Grant. In Day and Lyman Counties, a few poles were downed with some short lived power outages. Marshall County had no reports of damage or power outages. Several thousand people were left without power for several hours up to several days. Power was not restored to some people until the fourth of November. Portions of Interstate 90 and Interstate 29 were closed from the evening of the 23rd until the morning of the 24th leaving hundreds of motorists stranded. There were also numerous school delays and closings. Many trees and some crops were also damaged as a result of the weight of the snow and high winds. Some snowfall amounts included, 4 inches near Reliance, at Doland, and near Victor, 5 inches southeast of Stephan and at Sisseton, 6 inches south of Ree Heights and at Eden, eight inches at Waubay and Grenville, 9 inches at Clear Lake, 10 inches at Watertown, and 12 inches at Summit and Milbank. This was the third damaging storm to the rural electric cooperatives this year and has been called the worst natural disaster in the history of the rural electrics. Total damage estimate for the state rural electrics was $9.5 million.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 80 (1963) Aberdeen: 5 (1895)
Kennebec: 85 (1963) Kennebec: 2 (1917)
Mobridge: 78 (1927) Mobridge: 8 (1917)
Pierre: 85 (1973) Pierre: 15 (1981)
Sisseton: 82 (1963) Sisseton: 10 (1936)
Timber Lake: 78 (1963) Timber Lake: 10 (1981)
Watertown: 79 (1927) Watertown: 6 (1917)
Wheaton: 81 (1963) Wheaton: 10 (1917)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 0.87" (1947) Aberdeen: 0.5" (1995)
Kennebec: 0.70" (1995) Kennebec: 7.0" (1995)
Mobridge: 0.49" (1943) Mobridge: 0.1" (1980)
Pierre: 0.66" (1975) Pierre: 1.5" (1995)
Sisseton: 1.10" (1995) Sisseton: 4.0" (1995)
Timber Lake: 0.73" (2004)
Watertown: 1.06" (1995) Watertown: 10.4" (1995)
Wheaton: 0.80" (1957)


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