This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 31 October 1991 → A severe winter storm dubbed the Great Halloween Mega Storm struck the upper Midwest. Minnesota bore the brunt of the storm. Blizzard conditions occurred with wind gusts frequently to 50 mph. By the time the storm finally ended on November 2, Duluth received 37 inches of snow, Minneapolis 28 inches, and International Falls 18 inches. For Duluth and Minneapolis, this set new all time records for single storm totals. These two cities received nearly half their normal seasonal snows in this one storm.
 31 October 1994 → American Eagle Flight 4184 was completing its last turn in holding before being cleared for landing at O'Hare Airport in Chicago. After holding in pattern for an hour in wintry precipitation, enough ice accumulated on the aircraft that the plane became uncontrollable and crashed in Roselawn, IN. All 68 on board the ATR-72-212 aircraft were killed.

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September 3, 1974:

An early freeze occurred across Minnesota on September 3rd as temperatures fell into the upper 20s to the lower 30s. This was the earliest freeze on record in some parts of the state ending the growing season. Greatest damage was to the soybean and corn crop. Honey production was also ended. Damage estimates were in excess of 100 million dollars.

September 3, 1999:

Very heavy rains from thunderstorms repeatedly going over the same area resulted in extensive flash flooding in a 30 to 40 mile wide band from Fort Pierre in southeast Stanley County to Hecla in northeast Brown County. Rainfall amounts in this corridor ranged from 3 to 7 inches. As a result, the communities of Blunt in Hughes County and Onida in Sully county were severely flooded. Most of the homes and businesses were flooded throughout Blunt and Onida causing severe damage. Only a few homes in these communities were spared from receiving water in there basements. Most homes also experienced sewer backup. The sewer systems in both Onida and Blunt were flooded and shutdown. Many people had to go to temporary shelters as a result of the flooding. Aberdeen and Fort Pierre had a lot of street flooding resulting in road closures and detours. Also, several basements in Aberdeen and Fort Pierre had sewer backup. The heavy rain flooded many township and county roads along with several state and U.S. highways. Sections of Highways 14, 20, 83, and 1806 along with many other roads in central and northeast South Dakota had to be closed. Many of the township and county roads had massive amounts of gravel washed away. Some bridges received minor damage with some culverts also lost. A few pets and livestock were also lost as a result of the flooding. Many acres of crops were flooded throughout the area. The DM & E railroad had some of its trackline flooded for a time. Some rainfall amounts included, 3 inches at Fort Pierre, 4 inches at Hecla and in the Aberdeen Area, 5 inches at the Sand Lake Wildlife Refuge and at Blunt, 6 inches at Seneca, 7 inches 10 miles southeast of Gettysburg and at Onida.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 102 (1897) Aberdeen: 31 (1974)
Kennebec: 105 (1983) Kennebec: 31 (1974)
Mobridge: 99 (2005) Mobridge: 33 (1928)
Pierre: 104 (2005) Pierre: 36 (1974)
Sisseton: 96 (1976) Sisseton: 38 (1946)
Timber Lake: 104 (2007) Timber Lake: 34 (1961)
Watertown: 101 (1893) Watertown: 30 (1974)
Wheaton: 100 (1983) Wheaton: 37 (1918)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 1.53" (1941)
Kennebec: 1.30" (1963)
Mobridge: 1.10" (1941)
Pierre: 0.95" (1963)
Sisseton: 0.92" (2005)
Timber Lake: 0.80" (1951)
Watertown: 1.22" (1999)
Wheaton: 0.80" (1999)


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