This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 17 April 1922 → Seven tornadoes caused death and destruction along parts of a 210 mile swath from north of Ogden, IL to Allen County, OH, killing 16 people. There were three F2s, two F3s, and two F4s. A post card, picked up in Madison County, IN was found 124 miles away near Mount Cory, OH.
 17 April 1935 → A hailstone reportedly 8" in diameter hit near Ponca City, OK.
 17 April 1952 → Massive flooding throughout the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest reached its peak. Large portions of the Dakotas, Minnesota, and Iowa were inundated. At Sioux City, IA the Missouri River raced by at 30 mph filled with telephone poles, trees, furniture, and other debris from upstream. In the Omaha/Council Bluffs area 30,000 people were evacuated. At St Paul, MN the Mississippi hit a record high and forced 7000 people from their homes.
 17 April 1953 → A storm containing hail, ice, snow, sleet, and rain battered Oklahoma, with 10,000 claims turned into insurance companies.
 17 April 2004 → A 182-day long streak of no measurable rain began in San Diego, CA. The streak ended on October 17.

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September 8, 1959:

High winds and areas of blowing dust occurred across parts of central South Dakota from Walworth to Mellette. During the evening, wind gusts of 40 to 50 mph affected the counties either side of the Missouri River. Low visibility in blowing dust was blamed for a four-car crash near Pierre, injuring five persons, another accident near Mobridge injured one person. Barn buildings were blown over or unroofed near Delmont in Douglas County. Lightning started grass fires and burned several thousand acres of rangeland in Mellete and Lyman counties.

September 8, 1977:

In the late afternoon, high winds associated with a cold front gusted to 70 mph and destroyed six buildings on a farm north and east of Reliance. At 500 pm, winds ripped a camper off a pickup truck 12 miles south of Pierre. Winds were measured at 68 mph at Pierre. At 6 pm cdt, winds gusting to 70 mph damaged many trees in the Watertown area, power lines, and some buildings. A trailer and truck, twelve miles north of Watertown, were blown over while traveling on Interstate 29. A large oil tank was also destroyed. At Rapid City, the winds gusted to 75 mph around noon mdt with many trees downed. Also, some buildings had windows broken and roofs damaged with a mobile home overturned. There were minor reports of damage from a number of counties, mostly in the eastern part of the state. The damage was the result of high winds with a cold front which crossed the state during the afternoon and evening of the 8th. The strong winds also caused blowing dust in the western part of the state resulting in the several accidents.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 101 (1933) Aberdeen: 32 (1992)
Kennebec: 105 (1931) Kennebec: 36 (1995)
Mobridge: 102 (1959) Mobridge: 35 (1943)
Pierre: 102 (1959) Pierre: 39 (1995)
Sisseton: 102 (1959) Sisseton: 37 (2008)
Timber Lake: 102 (1959) Timber Lake: 36 (1929)
Watertown: 98 (1931) Watertown: 30 (1907)
Wheaton: 104 (1931) Wheaton: 38 (1992)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 3.02" (2009)
Kennebec: 0.80" (1951)
Mobridge: 0.93" (2007)
Pierre: 1.11" (1985)
Sisseton: 0.84" (1938)
Timber Lake: 0.27" (2007)
Watertown: 2.42" (1985)
Wheaton: 1.28" (1991)


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