This Day in National/World Weather History ...
 1 November 1870 → General Albert J. Myer, head of the U.S. Signal Corps Weather Service, ordered the first simultaneous gathering of weather data across the United States. The information was used to produce the first national weather maps.
 1 November 2000 → The most widespread and severe flooding since 1947 was underway across parts of Britain as ten rivers in the UK flowed out of their banks.
 1 November 2001 → Road crews were clearing snow from the highways of western North Dakota while winds were gusting to 55 mph 125 miles away in Bismarck.

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September 8, 1959:

High winds and areas of blowing dust occurred across parts of central South Dakota from Walworth to Mellette. During the evening, wind gusts of 40 to 50 mph affected the counties either side of the Missouri River. Low visibility in blowing dust was blamed for a four-car crash near Pierre, injuring five persons, another accident near Mobridge injured one person. Barn buildings were blown over or unroofed near Delmont in Douglas County. Lightning started grass fires and burned several thousand acres of rangeland in Mellete and Lyman counties.

September 8, 1977:

In the late afternoon, high winds associated with a cold front gusted to 70 mph and destroyed six buildings on a farm north and east of Reliance. At 500 pm, winds ripped a camper off a pickup truck 12 miles south of Pierre. Winds were measured at 68 mph at Pierre. At 6 pm cdt, winds gusting to 70 mph damaged many trees in the Watertown area, power lines, and some buildings. A trailer and truck, twelve miles north of Watertown, were blown over while traveling on Interstate 29. A large oil tank was also destroyed. At Rapid City, the winds gusted to 75 mph around noon mdt with many trees downed. Also, some buildings had windows broken and roofs damaged with a mobile home overturned. There were minor reports of damage from a number of counties, mostly in the eastern part of the state. The damage was the result of high winds with a cold front which crossed the state during the afternoon and evening of the 8th. The strong winds also caused blowing dust in the western part of the state resulting in the several accidents.


Record Highs: Record Lows:
Aberdeen: 101 (1933) Aberdeen: 32 (1992)
Kennebec: 105 (1931) Kennebec: 36 (1995)
Mobridge: 102 (1959) Mobridge: 35 (1943)
Pierre: 102 (1959) Pierre: 39 (1995)
Sisseton: 102 (1959) Sisseton: 37 (2008)
Timber Lake: 102 (1959) Timber Lake: 36 (1929)
Watertown: 98 (1931) Watertown: 30 (1907)
Wheaton: 104 (1931) Wheaton: 38 (1992)

Record Precipitation:
Aberdeen: 3.02" (2009)
Kennebec: 0.80" (1951)
Mobridge: 0.93" (2007)
Pierre: 1.11" (1985)
Sisseton: 0.84" (1938)
Timber Lake: 0.27" (2007)
Watertown: 2.42" (1985)
Wheaton: 1.28" (1991)


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