Eastern ND and Northwest MN Weather History

The Weather History for the Month of November

11/1/1990
74 degrees in Fargo. Record monthly high.
11/2/1997
A strong low pressure system created an intense pressure gradient across the Red River Valley, producing wind gusts over 50 mph. The strong wind blew several inches of fresh snow around, which resulted in reduced visibilities in the Red River Valley.
11/3/1997
A strong low pressure system created an intense pressure gradient across the Red River Valley, producing wind gusts over 50 mph. The strong wind blew several inches of fresh snow around, which resulted in reduced visibilities in the Red River Valley.
11/4/2008
Heavy rain and snow event added to the record wet fall period for Grand Forks and Fargo.
11/5/2008
Heavy rain and snow event added to the record wet fall period for Grand Forks and Fargo.
11/6/2008
Heavy rain and snow event added to the record wet fall period for Grand Forks and Fargo.
11/7/2008
Heavy rain and snow event added to the record wet fall period for Grand Forks and Fargo.
11/8/2005
An area of surface low pressure took shape over southeast Montana on tuesday morning (11-8-05). The low tracked east into north central South Dakota, shifted northeast toward Grand Forks, ND, before finally exiting into southwest Ontario. The low, which began at 1006 mb in southeast Montana, rapidly deepened as it moved from Grand Forks into southwest Ontario. By wednesday morning (11-9-05), the low had deepened to 988 mb. With the rapidly deepening surface low pressure system, northwest winds also became quite strong once the low passed into Canada. Tree branches were knocked onto wires in the Fargo-Moorhead area, causing some brief power outages. Garbage cans, lawn furniture, and debris were blown around all across the area. A tree fell on a house in Bemidji, while other fallen trees caused sporadic power outages across northwest Minnesota.
11/9
Grand Forks record high temperature of 57 set in 1954, record low of -3 set in 1979. For Fargo, record high of 65 set in 1937, record low of -1 set in 1979, record precipitation of 1.50 inches set in 1977 and a 5.6 inches of snow in 1977.
11/10/1998
First blizzard of the season in the Red River Valley. Winds gusted over 50 mph and produced 3-5 inches of snow with a bit more in some areas. Schools were closed and Interstate 29 was closed from Grand Forks to Hillsboro.
11/11/1933
There was a dust storm in portions of southeast North Dakota into west central Minnesota, and visibility was near zero. A blizzard occurred in the Devils Lake Basin into the northern Red River Valley.
11/12/1933
There was a dust storm in portions of southeast North Dakota into west central Minnesota, and visibility was near zero. A blizzard occurred in the Devils Lake Basin into the northern Red River Valley.
11/13/1997
Four to seven inches of snow fell across southeast North Dakota in Barnes, Ransom and Sargent counties, along with winds gusting to around 40 mph. Visibilities were low and travel was dangerous. Schools in Valley City were closed for the day.
11/14/1909
There was 14 inches of snow in Fargo, setting a record for daily snowfall in November.
11/15/2005
A 1002 mb surface low over eastern Missouri at noon on tuesday (11-15-05) quickly deepened to 995 mb near Chicago that same evening. This produced a strong pressure gradient across the northern plains. With fresh snow cover along the North Dakota/Manitoba border, whiteout conditions quickly occurred due to the strong northwest winds. Some truckers traveling along Interstate 29 were stranded at Pembina, ND, for the night.
11/16/1996
A blizzard gripped the Red River Valley with 8-13 inches of snow and wind gusts over 50 mph. 13.5 inches of snow was recorded in Fargo with 11 inches in Grand Forks. US highway 2 was closed from Grand Forks to Crookston during the blizzard.
11/17/1996
A blizzard gripped the Red River Valley with 8-13 inches of snow and wind gusts over 50 mph. 13.5 inches of snow was recorded in Fargo with 11 inches in Grand Forks. US highway 2 was closed from Grand Forks to Crookston during the blizzard.
11/18/1998
Snow for all of eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota started out as some lightning and thunder at Valley City and Fargo. 13 inches of snow was reported at the Grand Forks AFB and 12.9 inches at the NWS in Grand Forks. I-29 was closed from Fargo to the Canadian Border and Highway 2 from Devils Lake to Grand Forks.
11/19/1998
Snow for all of eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota started out as some lightning and thunder at Valley City and Fargo. 13 inches of snow was reported at the Grand Forks AFB and 12.9 inches at the NWS in Grand Forks. I-29 was closed from Fargo to the Canadian Border and Highway 2 from Devils Lake to Grand Forks.
11/20/1996
Snow up to 7 inches with very little wind occurred over portions of western Polk, Clay and Norman counties in Minnesota.
11/21
Grand Forks record high temperature of 60 set in 2006, record low of -15 set in 1985. For Fargo, record high of 58 set in 2006, record low of -14 set in 1896, record precipitation of 1.05 inches set in 1893 and a 10.5 inches of snow in 1893.
11/22/1993
A Large Part of North Dakota A slow moving and enormous storm over North America brought record single-storm snowfall to much of North Dakota. Over two feet of snow fell over a large part of central and southeast North Dakota, and most of North Dakota had over a foot of snow from this storm. The greatest snowfall amount was reported at Oakes, in Dickey county in southeast North Dakota, 31 inches. At the National Weather Service office in Bismarck, 28.3 inches of snow was measured during the 108-hour snow event. This amount set a new single-storm record for snow in Bismarck. The snow began the evening of the 22nd and did not end until the morning of the 27th. Except for about six hours during the day on the 26th, the snow was continuous through this period. The snowfall was intermittent over most of North Dakota during this lengthy event. Fortunately, the wind was only 10 to 25 MPH during this storm, so it was well below blizzard conditions and blowing and drifting of snow was not a problem. The storm occurred during the week of Thanksgiving, so many travelers were stranded. The prolonged snowfall kept snow removal crews working around the clock, and a few motorists crashed into the snowplows. Out in the rural areas, some farm buildings collapsed in the heavy snow.
11/23/2003
A surface low tracked from Missouri into northern Wisconsin, where it deepened over the Great Lakes. A very strong temperature and moisture gradient set up over eastern South Dakota into central Minnesota, where the heaviest snow fell. 4 to 10 inches of snow brushed portions of Grant, eastern Otter Tail, Wadena, and Hubbard counties. The most snow, 10 inches, was reported 4 miles west of Staples. North winds increased to 20 to 30 mph, with gusts to 35 mph, as the low moved into the Great Lakes.
11/24/1908
2.10 inches of liquid equivalent precipitation fell in Fargo, setting the monthly record for November.
11/25/1996
Record cold temperatures occurred across the region with 19 below zero in both Fargo and Grand Forks on the morning of the 26th.
11/26/1896
The infamous Thanksgiving Day storm, rain and thunderstorms in southern Minnesota, snow and blizzard in ND and central and northern MN counties. People caught traveling for the holiday. Severe cold wave as Pokegama Dam went down to -45 degree F.
11/27/2005
An inverted trough stretched into the Red River Valley, from a low pressure system passing through the central plains. The precipitation began as a mixture of rain and freezing rain, falling quite heavily at times. The most freezing rain fell across southeast North Dakota and portions of west central Minnesota, although lighter amounts did fall further north. Trees and powerlines became weighted down with up to an inch of ice in places. As temperatures cooled and wind speeds increased, powerlines started to gallop and break in great numbers. Richland County in North Dakota and Wilkin County in Minnesota were hit the hardest from the freezing rain and power outages. Thousands of people lost power as several thousand wooden power poles were snapped. Additionally, one high voltage transmission line in southeast North Dakota was broken. Roads were blocked by fallen trees, branches, and powerlines. Many vehicle accidents and several injuries were reported due to the treacherous road conditions. The wind speeds increased around the noon hour on monday (11-28-05) causing blizzard conditions across southeast North Dakota and west central Minnesota. Whiteout conditions continued into tuesday morning (11-29-05). Many schools were closed on both monday and tuesday, especially along and south of Interstate 94 in North Dakota and U.S. Highway 10 in Minnesota. For many schools, these were the first back-to-back day closures since the record winter of 1996-97. Interstate 29 was closed from Fargo to the South Dakota border, Interstate 94 was closed from Jamestown to Fergus Falls, and U.S. Highway 10 was closed from Moorhead to Detroit Lakes. Both the Fargo and Grand Forks airports were shut down and many areas advised no travel. Interstate 29 north of Fargo was also shut down for about an hour because a power line fell across the interstate. In southeast North Dakota, community centers and nursing homes were used as shelters for residents without power. Cass, Ransom, Richland, and Sargent Counties received a Presidential Disaster Declaration, the third one for North Dakota for 2005. The Governor of North Dakota sent National Guard troops and generators to southeast North Dakota, especially the communities of Fairmount, Lidgerwood, and Hankinson.
11/28/2005
An inverted trough stretched into the Red River Valley, from a low pressure system passing through the central plains. The precipitation began as a mixture of rain and freezing rain, falling quite heavily at times. The most freezing rain fell across southeast North Dakota and portions of west central Minnesota, although lighter amounts did fall further north. Trees and powerlines became weighted down with up to an inch of ice in places. As temperatures cooled and wind speeds increased, powerlines started to gallop and break in great numbers. Richland County in North Dakota and Wilkin County in Minnesota were hit the hardest from the freezing rain and power outages. Thousands of people lost power as several thousand wooden power poles were snapped. Additionally, one high voltage transmission line in southeast North Dakota was broken. Roads were blocked by fallen trees, branches, and powerlines. Many vehicle accidents and several injuries were reported due to the treacherous road conditions. The wind speeds increased around the noon hour on monday (11-28-05) causing blizzard conditions across southeast North Dakota and west central Minnesota. Whiteout conditions continued into tuesday morning (11-29-05). Many schools were closed on both monday and tuesday, especially along and south of Interstate 94 in North Dakota and U.S. Highway 10 in Minnesota. For many schools, these were the first back-to-back day closures since the record winter of 1996-97. Interstate 29 was closed from Fargo to the South Dakota border, Interstate 94 was closed from Jamestown to Fergus Falls, and U.S. Highway 10 was closed from Moorhead to Detroit Lakes. Both the Fargo and Grand Forks airports were shut down and many areas advised no travel. Interstate 29 north of Fargo was also shut down for about an hour because a power line fell across the interstate. In southeast North Dakota, community centers and nursing homes were used as shelters for residents without power. Cass, Ransom, Richland, and Sargent Counties received a Presidential Disaster Declaration, the third one for North Dakota for 2005. The Governor of North Dakota sent National Guard troops and generators to southeast North Dakota, especially the communities of Fairmount, Lidgerwood, and Hankinson.
11/29/2002
A strong cold front moved through the northern plains and produced a period of strong winds. The highest gust was reported at St. Vincent, MN, at 58 mph.
11/30/1905
The mercury dipped to -27, and this was the coldest temperature ever for the month of November in Fargo.

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