Joe's Corner

THE DECADE OF THE 1940S

 

AVERAGE YEARLY TEMPERATURE

AVERAGE SUMMER TEMPERATURE

AVERAGE WINTER TEMPERATURE

TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE YEAR

1940

46.1 DEGREES

71.8 DEGREES

19.9 DEGREES

26.64 INCHES

1941

48.5 DEGREES

72.9 DEGREES

21.3 DEGREES

20.68 INCHES

1942

46.2 DEGREES

70.2 DEGREES

23.2 DEGREES

27.94 INCHES

1943

45.5 DEGREES

71.2 DEGREES

17.5 DEGREES

23.45 INCHES

1944

46.4 DEGREES

68.6 DEGREES

25.0 DEGREES

32.21 INCHES

1945

45.3 DEGREES

67.5 DEGREES

22.0 DEGREES

25.37 INCHES

1946

46.6 DEGREES

69.8 DEGREES

17.7 DEGREES

26.26 INCHES

1947

45.5 DEGREES

71.7 DEGREES

20.0 DEGREES

25.61 INCHES

1948

45.8 DEGREES

71.2 DEGREES

15.8 DEGREES

27.58 INCHES

1949

46.0 DEGREES

73.2 DEGREES

14.3 DEGREES

20.76 INCHES

 

 

 

NUMBER OF DAYS 90 DEGREES OR MORE

NUMBER OF DAYS 100 DEGREES OR MORE

NUMBER OF DAYS 0 DEGREES OR LESS

NUMBER OF DAYS -10 DEGREES OR LESS

1940

25

5

28

7

1941

36

7

14

1

1942

15

2

22

11

1943

12

0

29

10

1944

6

0

14

3

1945

6

0

25

4

1946

19

0

21

7

1947

40

7

27

6

1948

31

1

33

15

1949

33

0

38

11

The decade of the 1940s had an average temperature of 46.2 degrees which was slightly above normal. The average summer temperature for the decade was 70.8 degrees which was slightly below normal and the average winter temperature for the decade of 19.7 degrees was more than a degree above normal. The decade avoided the extreme heat or cold with none of the yearly or seasonal averages making the list of top five for the century. The average summer temperature in 1945 of 67.5 degrees was the coolest summer of the decade and comes close to reaching the top five coolest summers of the 20th century. Nevertheless, the decade does boast the warmest August of the century when the temperature averaged 78.8 degrees in 1947. Other top 5 warm months include January 1944 (tied 2nd - 27.8 degrees), March 1946 (2nd - 42.0 degrees), March 1945 (5th - 40.5 degrees), May 1941 (tied 5th - 65.2 degrees), September 1948 (5th - 67.0 degrees), October 1947 (tied 3rd - 57.2 degrees), October 1940, (5th - 56.6 degrees), and November 1949 (4th - 40.0 degrees). The average temperature of 61.5 degrees during June 1945 is the second coldest of the century. The warmest and coldest March days of the 20th century occurred in 1940s - March 30,1943 reached a high of 88 degrees while March 11, 1948 had a bitterly cold 23 degrees below zero. The six days of temperatures 90 degrees or higher during 1944 and 1945 are tied for the fifth fewest days of that occurrence for the 20th century. The seven days of temperatures 100 degrees or higher during 1941 and 1947 are tied for the fifth most days of that occurrence for the century. The 251 days of temperatures zero degrees or colder for the decade is the third fewest of the century and the 75 days with temperatures of 10 degrees below zero or colder is the fewest of the century.

Precipitation for the decade of the 40s was 256.50 inches making it the fourth wettest of the 20th century. However, as with temperatures, no individual year or season was amongst the wettest or driest of the century. Even so, the 1940s can boast the wettest December of the century when December 1945 received 2.97 inches of precipitation. The fifth wettest February (1945 - 2.18 inches), fifth wettest March (1940, 3.44 inches), and fifth wettest April (1941, 5.45 inches) were all recorded in the decade. Also, the fourth and fifth wettest June of the century occurred in 1943 and 1947 with 7.28 and 7.27 inches of rainfall, respectively. With 7.79 inches of rain, July 1948 was the fourth wettest of the century. The driest July of the century occurred in 1947 when only 0.25 inches of rain was recorded. The fifth driest April occurred in 1949 with 0.32 inches. The second driest May occurred in 1940 with 0.39 inches of rain. The fourth driest September of the century occurred in 1943 with 0.55 inches of rain. Three inches of snow during May 1944 is the snowiest May of the century and two inches of snow in May 1943 is the second snowiest. Significant snowstorms for the decade occurred on February 4, 1945 with 10.5 inches and December 22-25 1945 with 13.5 inches.

Late season snows occurred during the decade with 3 inches on May 5 1944 and 2 inches on May 12 1943. The latest snow recorded in the century occurred during the morning of May 28 1947 when one half inch accumulated on grass, trees and cars.


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