Joe's Corner

THE DECADE OF THE 1950S

 

AVERAGE YEARLY TEMPERATURE

AVERAGE SUMMER TEMPERATURE

AVERAGE WINTER TEMPERATURE

TOTAL PRECIPITATION FOR THE YEAR

1950

42.2 DEGREES

67.3 DEGREES

15.7 DEGREES

21.24 INCHES

1951

42.2 DEGREES

67.4 DEGREES

18.1 DEGREES

30.79 INCHES

1952

45.8 DEGREES

71.4 DEGREES

17.1 DEGREES

18.86 INCHES

1953

47.0 DEGREES

72.4 DEGREES

21.0 DEGREES

30.05 INCHES

1954

46.8 DEGREES

72.4 DEGREES

21.4 DEGREES

24.69 INCHES

1955

46.2 DEGREES

74.5 DEGREES

18.3 DEGREES

18.16 INCHES

1956

45.4 DEGREES

72.3 DEGREES

12.3 DEGREES

22.74 INCHES

1957

46.0 DEGREES

72.1 DEGREES

19.1 DEGREES

28.19 INCHES

1958

46.6 DEGREES

69.8 DEGREES

23.4 DEGREES

15.33 INCHES

1959

45.8 DEGREES

74.2 DEGREES

14.4 DEGREES

29.81 INCHES

 

 

 

NUMBER OF DAYS 90 DEGREES OR MORE

NUMBER OF DAYS 100 DEGREES OR MORE

NUMBER OF DAYS 0 DEGREES OR LESS

NUMBER OF DAYS -10 DEGREES OR LESS

1950

9

0

51

24

1951

5

0

44

23

1952

33

0

28

10

1953

29

1

16

3

1954

24

2

17

9

1955

46

6

38

16

1956

31

1

36

15

1957

23

2

23

7

1958

27

1

26

9

1959

36

0

32

12

The decade of the 1950s had an average temperature of 45.4 degrees, about one half degree below the century average. The average summer temperature for the decade was 71.4 degrees, slightly above average, and the average winter temperature of 18.1 degrees was slightly below average. The decade started out cool. Both 1950 and 1951 had an average yearly temperature of 42.2 degrees which tied for the second coolest years of the century. Both years had very cold springs. In 1950, the average spring temperature was 39.2 degrees - the coldest this century. Spring 1951 was only slightly warmer with an average temperature of 40.4 degrees which was the second coldest spring of the century. Not surprisingly both springs contained some of the coolest months for the century. April 1950 was the coolest April of the century with an average temperature of 37.8 degrees while March 1951 was the second coolest March this century with an average temperature of 20.3 degrees. In addition the summer of 1950 was tied for the fourth coolest this century with an average temperatures of 67.3 degrees. This included the 3rd coolest July of the century when the average temperature was 68.0 degrees. The summer months of 1951 were the sixth coolest of the century with an average temperature of 67.4 degrees. The 4th coolest June and 2nd coolest September occurred in 1951 with an average temperature of 62.2 degrees and 56.1 degrees respectively. This contributed to the 3rd fewest number of days at 90 degrees or above at 5. There were several other months which were amongst the coolest this century. April 1953 was the 4th coolest with an average temperatures of 40.5 degrees. May 1954 was the 4th coolest May in the 20th century with an average temperature of 52.7 degrees. The third and fifth coolest November’s occurred in 1955 and 1959 with average temperatures of 24.3 degrees and 25.0 degrees respectively. While no individual years were amongst the 5 warmest this century, the summer of 1955 and the summer of 1959 were the third and eighth warmest summers this century respectively. The average summer temperature in 1955 was 74.5 degrees and in 1959 it was 74.2 degrees. The summer of 1955 also contained the 4th warmest July (79.5 degrees) and 5th warmest August (77.9 degrees). In addition, 1955 had 46 days with 90 degrees or higher temperatures - 3rd most this century. The warmest February of the century occurred in 1954 when the temperature averaged 33.4 degrees. Other top 5 warmest months include April 1955 (3rd - 54.6 degrees), June 1956 (4th - 75.1 degrees), November 1954 (5th - 39.9 degrees), and December 1957 (4th - 29.4 degrees). Meanwhile, the warmest February day of the century occurred on February 23, 1958 when the mercury topped out at 70 degrees. Also, the coolest August day of the century occurred August 20, 1950 when the low was 34 degrees. November 14, 1959 tied the coldest November day of the 20th century when the temperature fell to 17 degrees below zero. Finally, the decade also had the 3rd most days of 90 degrees or warmer (263 days) and the 53 days of zero or below in the winter of 1955-56 was tied for the second most this century.

The second driest decade of the 20th century occurred during the 50s with 239.86 inches of precipitation. The third driest year of the century occurred in 1958 with 15.33 inches of precipitation. The driest autumn of the century occurred in 1952 with 1.02 inches of precipitation. September 1952 was the second driest this century with 0.47 inches of rain while only a trace of precipitation occurred in October tying it for the driest October this century. The driest September of the century was in 1956 when only 0.29 inches of rain fell. Other dry months include July 1959 which was the 3rd driest July with 0.39 inches of rain and August 1958 where only 0.61 inches of rain fell making it the 4th driest on record. Only two months during the decade were amongst the wettest on record - June 1951 (3rd wettest) when 7.94 inches of rain fell and August 1959 (5th wettest) when 7.47 inches of rain fell. The wettest February day occurred on the 19th in 1952 at 1.62 inches which fell as 16.6 inches of snow. The 2.64 inches of rain on April 24 1953 is the wettest April day of the century. The wettest June day occurred on the 16th in 1957 with 4.26 inches of rain. The wettest December day occurred on the 3rd in 1955 with 1.41 inches of precipitation. The snowiest March of the 20th century occurred in 1951 with 31.5 inches of snow. Significant snowstorms during the decade of the 50s occurred December 2-4 1955 when snowfall totaled 12.8 inches, February 9-10 1959 with 11.0 inches, March 17-18 1957 with 11.4 inches, February 19-20 1953 with 12.4 inches, March 2-3 1951 with 14.8 inches, and March 9-10 1956 with 18.9 inches of snow.

On March 26, 1950 the lowest sea-level pressure of 28.63 inches occurred. A severe blizzard occurred on February 20 1953 after 12.4 inches of snow fell over a two day period. Wind gusts over 40 mph occurred much of the day producing near zero visibility and drifts to 8 to 10 feet. All travel came to a standstill.


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