IWX Coop awards for 2007

Napoleon, OH 10 year award

Napoleon Ohio award       Mr. Kent Bacon and his co-workers have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service at the Napoleon Wastewater Treatment Plant since 1997. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall and water equivalent, and the river level for the nearby Maumee River.  In January of 2000 they recorded 11.0 inches of snowfall for just one month. Also in February of 2003 they recorded 12.2 inches of snowfall for just one month and recently in August of 2007 they recorded 9.79 inches of rainfall for just one month. These observations are part of the continuous weather record reported at Napoleon, Ohio for the National Weather Service since 1887. The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. Pictured Kent Bacon (L) and Brentley Lothamer (R) OPL at Northern Indiana NWS office.

 

Hicksville, OH 15 year award

Hicksville, OH 15 year award       Mr. Robert Meyer has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1992 at his home. Prior to that, he was taking weather observations at the Hicksville Wastewater Treatment Plant. Daily maximum temperatures and minimum temperatures along with daily precipitation are recorded each day. His observations have helped continue weather observations to have been taken at Hicksville, OH for the National Weather Service since 1965. Over the years he has recorded some high precipitation totals. For example, in March 2002 he recorded 10.0 inches of snowfall for just one month and recently in August of 2007 he recorded 9.71 inches of rainfall for just one month. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The weather data that Mr. Meyer collects is also used by local businesses. Mr. Meyer diligently keeps all weather data that he has collected since he started. In the past, a relative of his has also kept weather records for the National Weather Service. Pictured is Mr. Meyer (right) accepting his 15 year award from Brentley Lothamer…Observation Program Leader at the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

Kingsbury, IN 15 year award

Kingsbury, IN 15 year award     Mr. Frank Zolvinski has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1992. He records precipitation every day. He began his weather observing career by seeing an ad in the local newspaper requesting a weather observer for his area. He does a lot of work for his church and wanted to practice what he teaches, so he wanted to volunteer and help out others and his community by taking weather observations. His family also has a dairy farm nearby and over his years of taking weather observations, they have inquired of him numerous times on how much precipitation he received. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. For example, in August of 2007, he recorded 12.98 inches of rainfall. Also this September 2008 he has recorded over nine inches of rainfall…which included the remains of Hurricane Ike. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. Zolvinski for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. Pictured is Mr. Zolvinski (left) accepting his 15 year award from Brentley Lothamer…Observation Program Leader at the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

Defiance, OH 25 year award

Defiance, OH 25 year award     The Defiance Water Treatment Plant has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1982. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall and snowfall water equivalent, and the river level measurements for the nearby Maumee River.  In January of 2008 they recorded -2 degrees F for a low temperature for both the 25 th and 26 th. The Plant recorded 8 days above 90 degrees F back in July 2006 and recorded only 0.98 inches of rain in April 2004. These observations are part of the continuous weather record reported at Defiance, Ohio for the National Weather Service since 1895. The data collected is ingested daily into new weather model runs, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like the Defiance Water Treatment Plant. Pictured is Mr. Adam McDowell accepting the 25 year award for the Defiance Water Treatment Plant.

 

Huntington Water Works receives 75 year award

Huntington Water Works 75 year award cake    Huntington Water Works 75 year award picture 2

Huntington Water Works 75 year award picture 3    Huntington Water Works 75 year award picture 4

The Huntington Water Works has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since November 1932 and thusly have been awarded the 75 year Institutional Award for taking weather observations. That’s approximately 27,375 observations. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall and snowfall water equivalent.  These observations taken by the Huntington Water Works are part of the continuous weather record reported at Huntington, Indiana for the National Weather Service since October 1882. Volunteer weather observers conscientiously contribute their time so that observations can provide the vital information needed. These data are invaluable in learning more about the floods, droughts, heat and cold waves affecting us all. The data are also used in agricultural planning and assessment, engineering, environmental-impact assessment, utilities planning, litigation, and in assessing the amount of rain/snow that has fallen. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. COOP data plays a critical role in efforts to recognize and evaluate the extent of human impacts on climate from local to global scales. The Huntington Water Works is part of the U.S. Historical Climatology Network (USHCN). The USHCN is a high-quality moderate sized data set developed to assist in the detection of regional climate change. Following are some examples of some extremes recorded by observers at the Huntington Water Works. A high temperature of 102 degrees F was recorded on July 10 1988. A low temperature of -28 degrees F was recorded on January 11 1982. On July 5 2003… 5.53 inches of rainfall was recorded. On January 18 1998… 10.4 inches of snowfall was recorded. On February 9 1982 and on February 19 2007…there were 15 inches of snow on the ground. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like the Huntington Water Works.

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